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‘Time Warp’ Update and Interview with Joshua P. Warren

Last week, paranormal researcher and inventor of The Wishing Machine Joshua P. Warren made international headlines with his announcement that he had discovered a “time warp” outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. Warren says he detected a spot in the desert in which time itself was observed to slow down by 20 milliseconds. Warren reports the discovery was made using a device called a DT-Meter, or differential time meter, claimed by its inventor to be able to “detect and measure the effects of technology that is able to bend space-time.” According to inventor Ron Heath’s website, “examples of this technology would be a UFO that bends space-time, or uses gravity as part of it’s propulsion system.”

Joshua P. Warren

Naturally, I was skeptical about this discovery. A single anomalous measurement is hardly conclusive proof of anything, particularly one using an unknown device which appears to have been made in some dude’s basement and sold on eBay. However, as someone who writes about the paranormal and unexplained, I am open to all possibilities – given sufficient evidence. 

To that end, I recently spoke with Joshua P. Warren about his discovery and the device he used. To start, I asked Warren if he has been able to reproduce the same result at the same site:

This result is truly an anomaly. I have tested the same site three times, but this only happened for a moment on one occasion. However, I have used the DT-Meter all over the desert, between Vegas and Area 51, and it has always been easily, and reliably, calibrated and operated just as intended. In fact, the inventor of the device, Silicon Valley engineer Ronald Heath, has had two of them running on property in California for months, logging results 24/7, and he has never seen one anomaly. When he saw my reading he said ‘WOW! Incredible!!!’

Warren says he is the first individual to own one of these devices after they only became available in the last month. One thing I immediately wondered about the device after reading this story is if it was calibrated against an external control, to which Warren replied that while he did not perform such a control calibration himself, he’s sure the DT-Meter’s inventor calibrated it and that he followed the onboard calibration instructions with each use. Thus, while Warren admits that a malfunction is indeed a possibility, he considers it to be the least likely of all of the possible explanations for the time anomaly he detected given the impeccable performance of the device in every other test:

Since humans are imperfect, no scientific results can be truly conclusive. But there is no direct evidence that the meter performed any differently that day, at that spot, than it has on any other occasion. Given all the variables, since the DT-Meter has worked reliably in every other case, and we know from mainstream science that spacetime anomalies exist, I think this reading is most likely an accurate recording of one such anomaly, and the first of many we will discover, on a civilian level, in the coming years.

In another post on one of his sites, Warren cites that this anomaly could be due to a black hole approaching Earth, or perhaps some type of gravity or spacetime-bending technology nearby. Warren pointed out that there are several well-known areas nearby where exotic or extraterrestrial technologies are rumored to be tested or de-engineered by the likes of Robert Bigelow and others – not to mention the infamous Area 51. I asked Warren if he suspects the nearby installations at Groom Lake/Area 51 might have something to do with the time anomaly. While Warren says he is open to the possibility, he says the readings he took at locations much closer to the facility came back normal:

The Groom Lake facility is so huge that one can conceivably tie any weird phenomenon in Nevada to conspiracies regarding their work. However, I cannot say that this particular result was directly related to Groom Lake. I traveled hundreds of miles testing spots in the desert, about every 20-30 miles, between Las Vegas and past Rachel, Nevada (near Area 51). Surprisingly, the land around Groom Lake/Area 51 tested as completely normal. It was only this one site, about 20 miles north of Vegas, in the desert, where I got the anomalous reading.

What might be the cause of this anomalous reading Warren took with the DT-Meter? Ultimately, it’s difficult to say given just one reading. However, within the field of physics there is some precedent for such anomalies. For one, there’s the the phenomenon of time dilation as proven by the famous Hafele-Keating experiment and other studies, in which working clocks have been found to report different times after travelling at different velocities. Clocks on the International Space Station, for example, run .014 seconds slower per year than clocks on Earth. However, since Warren discovered the time anomaly while stationary on the surface of Earth, these types of effects normally shouldn’t apply.

The gravitational pull of blackholes could actually allow for closed timelike curves.

The gravitational effects of blackholes can actually distort spacetime.

Of course, as Warren notes, there are other documented cases of physical anomalies here on Earth, such as inconsistencies in the Earth’s gravitational field detected by space agencies. Given that gravitational effects can also lead to time dilation, could the site of this Las Vegas time warp be home to some type of unknown gravitational anomaly? Much more data from a variety of sources would need to be collected to even begin approaching such a conclusion.

For now, Warren says his plans for the DT-Meter and the time warp going forward are to collect more data and look for any other locations which display similar time distortions in order to determine if there might be a correlation or pattern among other sites.

Like many of us, I hope to someday discover or be shown be conclusive proof of higher mysteries, extraterrestrial intelligence, or the paranormal. As most of us seekers who grew up on The X-Files, I truly want to believe. However, I also feel that unsubstantiated claims or premature conclusions can sometimes do harm to the paranormal research community and reinforce common stigmas levied at the study of anomalous phenomena. Where does this discovery stand? We’ve got a well-known paranormal researcher and inventor reporting a single anomalous reading taken with a homemade device. Is this conclusive proof of a time warp?

You decide.