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Area 51: Why It’s Futile To Try And Get In

Trying to access Area 51 is dicey, dangerous, pointless and fruitless. Do not do it. Such is the extent of the surveillance of the landscape that surrounds the base (and all of the Nevada Test and Training Range, too), it’s all but impossible to successfully penetrate the secret base. Cameras, motion-detection devices, heat-seeking technology, night-vision, aerial drones, helicopters and much more collectively ensure that any attempt to stroll onto Area 51 – whether by day or night – will simply not work. That doesn’t prevent people from thinking they can do exactly that, though. A perfect example of this stupid futility occurred in the latter part of 2012. It was in October of that year when a team from the BBC tried to achieve what no-one else had done: find a way into Area 51. The two primary figures in the saga were Andre Maxwell and Darren Perks. The former is a well-known Irish comedian, while Perks is a conspiracy-theorist. And for good measure, they had a few UFO sleuths with them too, as they traveled around not just Nevada, but also Arizona and California. The plan was for the pair to get as close as they could to Area 51, and have the film-crew capture all of the excitement for posterity. It didn’t quite work out like that, though. They should have known that: there was not a chance.

The entire crew and cast was clearly not prepared for what was about to come down on them. They actually thought that trying to get into the base under cover of darkness would actually work. Of course, it didn’t. And it couldn’t! Their first stop was the town of Rachel – the home of the Little A’Le’Inn, which is the closest place of normality to Area 51. Not too far away is what is known as Area 51’s “Back Gate.”

 

According to Perks: “There was no one around, no guards, no vehicles – nothing. We filmed for approximately thirty minutes and tried to call the guards but there was no one there and no sign of them. So we all decided to walk past the barriers onto the restricted area past the security huts and basically onto Area 51. Nothing happened.” Going through the gates does not mean that you are immediately on Area 51. The base itself is still more than eight miles from the gates. In other words, despite what Perks claimed, they were most assuredly not on Area 51, at all. They were still miles away from it. And trying to get to the base from the gate is impossible without the required clearance – as the team quickly learned to their cost.

For a while the team managed to get some stock-footage of the area. It was, however, when they decided to knock on the door of one of the security huts at the gate that all hell broke loose. Armed security personnel descended upon them, ordering them to lie down on the ground, face-down. Or else. Not surprisingly, one and all did exactly what they were told to do. And quickly, too. All of the team was extensively searched. And, for a while, their iPhones, wallets and cameras were confiscated. For around three hours they were forced to lie flat on the desert floor. Background checks followed, as did a trip to the local sheriff’s office, where they were duly chewed out and fined in the region of $500.00 each. A lesson was learned the hard way: if you try and penetrate Area 51, you will not succeed. Instead, you’ll have a gun pointed at you and you’ll likely end up out of cash and a file will be opened on you. In other words, unless you have a warped reason to have your life turned over for the worse, then be content with Google images of the base.

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Nick Redfern works full time as a writer, lecturer, and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. Nick has written 41 books, writes for Mysterious Universe and has appeared on numerous television shows on the The History Channel, National Geographic Channel and SyFy Channel.
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