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Private Company to Find and Chase UFOs Off the California Coast

If there’s money to be made in UFOs and Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, Silicon Valley would be the logical place to make it, since that’s where the all of the big money is being made these days. However, if there’s no money to be made, would Silicon Valley billionaires still be involved – perhaps as a noble cause? That may be the case with UAP eXpeditions, a new Silicon Valley nonprofit created to “field a top-notch group of uber-experienced professionals providing the public service of field testing new UAP related technologies.” Public service from Silicon Valley billionaires?

“Do fleets of UAP ‘migrate’ from Catalina Island to Guadalupe Island with a certain frequency?”

Kevin Day thinks they do, and that’s why he founded UAP eXpeditions. He tells MJ Banias of Motherboard (and a Mysterious Universe contributor) that the organization plans to put high-tech equipment off the coast of California for tracking UAPs like those famous Tac Tacs tracked by the USS NImitiz. Day should know about these because he was stationed on the USS Princeton during the encounter as an air intercept controller. He believes those “tic tacs” are still out there and he’s teamed up with Dr. Kevin Knuth, a former NASA scientist, to find them. While Day knows what they look like, Knuth knows how to capture their images and intimate details and share them with the public.

“[We] will obtain current satellite imagery of the area (more or less in the area of Catalina Island and southward for ~100 miles) and determine whether these anamolous objects can be observed. We will monitor these satellite images both manually and using machine learning and build up a database of detections, classifications, and any observed patterns of activity.

 

We will be using tracking security cameras in the visual to infrared wavelengths with telephoto lenses, human eyes on the water with high power binoculars and spotting scopes, as well as digital SLR cameras with high power telephoto lenses ranging from 400mm – 600+mm. We plan to have high-quality drones in the air with imaging capabilities. We are looking into IR imaging as well, as well as detectors for x-ray, gamma-ray and custom-built neutron detectors (which are designed to look for dark matter).”

What if it’s armed and dangerous?

What did I tell you? Now all they need is money. Day is already working with video game entrepreneur and angel investor Rizwan Virk and Deep Prasad, CEO of ReactiveQ, a quantum computing materials design pioneer. That’s not enough, so Day is pitching to more angel investors and crowd-funding as a backup. Virk admits that Day has a tough sell because the number of Silicon Valley UFO fans is small. He needs more people who think like Deep Prasad. Here’s what Prasad told Motherboard:

“As technologists we seek to master science and engineering in such a way that all of humanity benefits from it. In front of our eyes are technologies underlying these UFOs that are far beyond our understanding and capabilities of recreating … if we pay close attention and reverse these technologies to bring to the masses, we will see a world with interstellar travel at our fingertips.”

Reverse these technologies? Knuth’s plan seems to be limited to watching and tracking UAPs. Prasad appears to want to shoot down or capture them with the intent of reverse-engineering their technology. (This is a good place to note that no one has limited “their” to aliens or enemy planes or our own.) That sounds less like a noble cause and more like a movie plot or Space Force mission. Of course, this is Silicon Valley. The real question is: which one will make the most money? Without an actual UAP to study and play with, Day will have to pitch his Nimitz experience, smoke, mirrors and whatever Knuth can pick up with his observation devices. Virk offers one market that may be interested.

“Some reports of the technology have said that it gets into areas that we are just starting to explore in Silicon Valley – mind/computer interfaces.”

It was a malfunctioning mind/computer interface – do you still want a piece?

It’s hard to believe that Silicon Valley is “just starting to explore” mind/computer interfaces and equally hard to believe that this is the first thing the people putting up billions would be interested in. Then again, there have been many stranger ideas that raised billions – and a few of them made billions more.

Yes, UAP eXpeditions is a nonprofit. That doesn’t mean it’s not interested in making a profit. And it’s in Silicon Valley, which is ALWAYS interested in making a profit. Let’s hope Day and Knuth can keep their eye on the noble cause and provide what would be the first real public service in UAP studies.

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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