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UFO Photographed Near Where Mexican Air Force Had Mass Sighting

An interesting photo appeared this week in The Campeche Tribune showing an unidentified flying object taken while the photographer was shooting dust clouds from the Sahara Desert floating over Champotón Bay in the state of Campeche. While the photo is fairly clear despite the dust, the interesting part of the incident is that Campeche is the location of one of Mexico’s more famous UFO sightings – in 2004, Mexican Air Force pilots saw 11 UFOs and filmed them. Are these incidents related?

“I immediately took the photos and shared them in my social network. The characteristics are very similar to those of a flying saucer.”

Flying saucer UFO

Kind of like this, only not as close

The Campeche Tribune reports that local resident Luciano Carrillo photographed the UFO (see the photo here) on June 23rd at 7:15 pm. The dust haze is clearly visible and casts a shadow on a small island in the bay, but the saucer-like UFO is reflecting light from somewhere. Unfortunately, that’s the extent of the coverage by The Campeche Tribune and no other local media seems to have picked it up.

Radar operator: “There they go, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, no, there are eight. There we are going to see them, they go to an unusual speed. One, two, three, four, five , six, seven, eight in the screen.”

 

Captain: “Are they at the same altitude?”

 

Radar operator: “Affirmative”

Contrast the limited coverage of Luciano Carrillo’s UFO to that of the 11 UFOs seen and recorded by Mexican Air Force pilots on March 5, 2004. That incident and the video was reported by Mexican national news and on major news outlets around the world – CBS and Fox reported on it in the U.S. The objects were said to be flying at an altitude of 11,500 feet and the Air Force C-26 A crew claimed that they followed them and were surrounded by them, but the objects disappeared when they stopped the pursuit. Their speeds were said to have increased from 180 kph (112 mph) to 540 kph (335 mph) in seconds. The C-26A is a small plane and the crew was using it to search for drug smugglers. (You can see the entire video here.)

C-26 A (Credit: US Navy)

“I couldn’t say what it was … but I think they’re completely real.”

After hearing testimony like that from Lt. Mario Adrian Vazquez, the infrared equipment operator who recorded the UFOs, Mexico’s Defense Department released the video, the audio and the interviews, confirming the objects were unidentified. (Those were the days.) The news prompted celebrations from those who believed this was evidence of alien visitation, while skeptics suggested they were ball lightning (unlikely at that altitude), meteor fragments (kind of slow for that) or flares from oil rigs in the bay (kind of high for that too).

What other explanation could there have been for these UFOs? The location is about 1000 km (620 miles) from the Popocatapetl volcano where many UFO sightings have been reported. The bay off the coast of Campeche contains underwater asphalt volcanoes, but those aren’t known to attract UFOs. One other thing that wasn’t known by the public at the time but is well known now – UFOs would be seen and recorded later in 2004 by US Navy pilots attached to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. Was there ever an investigation into whether those two incidents may have been related? If there was, there don’t seem to be any public records of them, nor any follow-up of the Mexican Air Force sighting.

Which brings us back to the latest one. It’s unlikely there will be any government looks at Luciano Carrillo’s photo. It will probably be examined by UFOlogists for evidence of CGI tampering.

Military UFO sightings should get more investigation and probably do. Yet the public rarely gets to see the results. Whether you like the popular investigators and reporters in the UFO world or not, they’re at least keeping the incidents in the public eye, which is keeping pressure on the governments to disclose.

One of these days …

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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