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Mysterious News Briefly — August 6, 2020

Mysterious News Briefly – August 6, 2020

NASA is celebrating the eight anniversary of the Curiosity Mars Rover touching down on August 5, 2012. Curiosity probably made a wish that it never gets called back to Earth.

Scientists at the British Antarctic Survey have discovered 11 new colonies of emperor penguins on Antarctica by using satellite images to look for giant piles of penguin guano. Another effect of the worldwide shortage of toilet paper?

Astrophysicists studying the mineral signature of a supernova just ten hours after it exploded confirmed that half of the calcium in the universe comes from supernova events. A great discovery, but not a reason to stop taking your supplements.

According to a new gerontology study, American baby boomers born between 1946 and 1964 exhibit lower levels of cognitive functioning than members of older generations. Or as millennials explain, “OK boomer, this means you’re not as smart as your parents.”

A new study found that the growth of cities has resulted in three out of every four new emerging infectious diseases coming from animals. Some unclear on the concept think this is a reason to make rat-sized masks.

The fully-intact feet and wings of an enantiornithine bird that lived 99 million years ago have been found preserved in a piece of amber from northern Myanmar. This technique won’t keep your leftover wings safe in the office refrigerator.

Scientists have discovered organisms in sediments on the ocean floor whose energy level is so low, it’s difficult to tell if they’re even alive. “Been there, done that, vacuumed around them,” said parents of teenagers.

A new study found that the only two species that prefer to mate in private are humans and Arabian babbler birds. Arabian babblers must have special chirps that mean, “If this nest is rockin’, don’t come a-knockin’.”

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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