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Goat Walks on Hind Legs and Cat Grants Wishes for $127,000 — More Signs of the Apocalypse?

Does anyone REALLY need another sign that 2020 is either the year of the apocalypse or the strangest year of the last century … if not of all time? If that’s you, here are two more two consider. In India, people are flocking to a village to watch a goat walk around town on its hind legs. In Russia, a family owning a cat that grants wishes says they’ve received their three and are now selling it … for the low, low price of $127,000. Will they take an IOU until the buyer wishes for a few million? Are you convinced yet 2020 is like no other year? Are these signs of the apocalypse?

“In a 24-second clip posted by Triangle News, the bodacious billy can be seen walking upright for a whopping 10 meters — about 33 feet — in front of astonished onlookers in Telwara, Bihar. His biped balancing act reportedly has attracted throngs of gawkers from neighboring villages who are eager to witness the species-defying spectacle.”

This description and video (see it here) of a walking goat in Telwara, Bihar, on the far eastern side of India near the Bangladesh border, was posted on numerous sites and attributed to Triangle News, which supplies strange news stories to the major world tabloids, including The Daily Mail and the New York Post. The goat can reportedly walk 33 feet on just its hind legs and is drawing major crowds – possibly hoping that the goat might be a satyr like the mythical Pan, who was half-goat on the bottom. Or perhaps they were looking for a ‘scapegoat’ to blame 2020 on. To their credit, the media sources reveal that the goat was actually trained by locals, who obviously have too much pandemic shutdown time on their hands. Sadly, they didn’t train the goat to wear a mask.

Hold my beer and watch THIS walking …

Moving on to the wish-fulfilling cat for sale …

“I discovered his ability completely by accident. “I needed an apartment, and somehow I told Vincent for fun: ‘Fulfill my wish!’ And literally the next day I realized that everything would come true. You immediately feel that events are starting to take shape as they should. And a month later I already had an apartment.”

A Siberian woman named Elena told KP-Novosibirsk about her wish-fulfilling cat named E-Level Vincent (a Google translate error?) or Vinsik – a Scottish Fold cat, which refers a natural dominant-gene mutation that affects its body cartilage, causing its ears to “fold” forward. Elena says she got the cat from a kennel as a 2-month-old kitten in 2011 and learned its father (Rochester) was blue with regular ears while its mother (Octaviante Lolita) was black and had the same condition as Vinsik. No word on whether they were also wish-fulfilling cats, but finding Vinsik was like winning the lottery.

“The main thing is that after contacting the cat, money immediately floated like a river. So Elena was able to buy another apartment, and then a car.”

Unfortunately, Elena didn’t wish for enough money and Vinsik isn’t granting any more wishes – three must be the universal standard – so she’s running an ad to sell Vinsik for 10 million rubles or $129,250 US dollars. If you can’t afford that, she’s also selling ‘lucky’ strokes for only 2,000 rubles ($25). Before you ask, there’s no guarantee stroking Vinsik brings luck, but Elena seems convinced the new owner will get three new wishes. Will she provide that in writing? Be careful – that may couldn’t as one of your wishes.

Come back after I’ve had my coffee.

Would you walk a mile to see a walking goat? Would you pay the price of a house to but a wish-fulfilling cat that at best might only replace your house by doing what cats do … lose interest in you?

Can we pool our money and buy one wish … for 2020 to end early?

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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