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Pile of Scat Photographed on a Termite Mound May Belong to a Yowie

Is the pope Catholic? Does a bear sh*t in the woods? Does a Yowie crap on a termite mound?

Two of those are rhetorical questions while the third is being asked by folks in Far North Queensland after seeing photographs of a large amount of unknown scat on top of a broken termite mound. Was it left by Australia’s favorite bipedal hairy cryptid? Is it a sign or a warning? To what … or whom? If that huge pile is from something else, could it beat up a Yowie in a fight?

“A mate who loves bushwalking found these out west near the Eignsleigh River. The fresh poo carefully placed on a broken termite mound, whatever did this decided to break the termite mound and poo on it. No animal I know off would/could do that. Also the poo looks nothing like pig, roo, emu etc.”

This account, along with the photos, was posted on the Tablelands Yowie Sightings Facebook page and generated a number of comments, along with a pick-up by the Daily Mail (with the photos). For non-Aussies, the Tablelands refers to the Atherton Tablelands, a fertile plateau covering 64,768 square km (25,000 sq miles) including the cities of Mareeba and Atherton and many smaller towns. They’re due east from Cairns and include the Einasleigh (correct spelling) River, which combines with the Gilbert River to form the largest system in northern Australia.

Old Yowie depiction

 

“Being fairly fresh, my mate who was all alone, knew whatever did this was not far away. Walking on he started to feel as if something was watching him. Not far from that, he came across the railway sleepers in the tree! I know people often see tree limbs placed oddly up in trees and suspect yowie activity but limbs can fall from above naturally. A bloody heavy railway sleeper in a tree ain’t natural!!! Once my mate saw this he knew he was not alone and had the ominous feeling he wasn’t welcome.”

The scat (poo) was fresh and the bushwalker didn’t recognize it. Termites are eaten by echinidnas and anteaters but the damage and amount of scat don’t match their size. However, the biggest clue may be the “sleepers in the tree.” Sleepers are railroad ties and generally far too heavy for non-Jason Momoa humans to toss into trees. On the other hand, Yowies are said to reach 12 feet tall – the right height for throwing or placing sleepers. They’re not believed to eat termites, so the broken mound with the scat on top (sounds like a song in an Aussie musical, but I digress) could be interpreted to be a sign.

Cairn Railway under construction, showing sleepers

“He cut the trek short and headed back towards civilisation. But he felt the exact moment the “being watched” sensation stopped. Several hours later back at the Einsleigh pub he knocked down a couple of rums to calm down and told John the publican what he’d seen and felt. John wasn’t surprised and shared some other similar stories from the area.”

If you haven’t done in yet, the closing comments connect the dots for you. Many of the Facebook commenters agree that this sounds like a Yowie or hairy man encounter. The stacking of the poo (an old bush song?) is taken to be a warning to dogs, humans or something else. However, a few add some conflicting details, with perhaps the biggest being that the “sleepers in the tree” are said by many to have been there for a while. Others point out the obvious disappointment that the bushwalker didn’t get a sample of the scat. While it’s probably too late to go back and find it (the story was posted on Facebook nearly two weeks ago), it could be worth a trip just to check out the area for other signs one way or another.

“Fair dinkum! That’s one bloody compelling yarn and with photo evidence too!”

That is by far the best and most Aussie comment in the Facebook responses. And it points out the obvious – without DNA evidence, it’s just “one bloody compelling yarn.”

Fair dinkum!

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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