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Dinosaur Brains, Mongoose Warfare, 6G Satellite and More Mysterious News Briefly — November 11, 2020

Mysterious News Briefly — November 11, 2020

In a perfectly preserved skeleton of the Buriolestes schultzi, an ancestor of the long necked sauropods, researchers in Brazil found a pea-sized brain and braincase which allowed them to create the world’s first 3D image of a dinosaur’s brain, showing the regions involved in sight, smell, intelligence, and even reproduction. If peas could talk, would they describe themselves as dinosaur-brain-sized?

Dr. Anna Kubicka of Poland’s Wrocław University of Science and Technology has identified two types of measurement systems used by the Incas in the building of Machu Picchu in Peru — one of them was based on a 42 cm (16.5 in( unit module and the other 54 cm (21.25). No evidence yet whether they measured twice and cut once.

China has apparently launched the world’s first 6G satellite despite warnings from experts around the world about increasingly dangerous levels of space junk and feared but still unproven levels of electromagnetic radiation. Meanwhile, Chinese tech companies are probably hard at work on wider phones that can display more and higher bars.

The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory at Kirtland AF Base in New Mexico, has opened the Deployable Structures Laboratory (DeSel) for developing materials for new deployable space structures. How soon before it gets stormed for a festival?

Researchers have identified special kinds of particle called “gravitational molecules” that spin around black holes the way electrons spin around atoms, a discovery that may help explain dark matter. Meanwhile, Black Hole Spinners would be a great name for a band.

Biologists in Uganda studying “mongoose warfare” —   where families of banded mongooses form battle lines, run at other families and then fight in screaming balls of ru – have determined that the reason for the wars is to give females a chance to mate with enemy males and minimize inbreeding. On the list of ‘animals that might act like Vikings’, did anyone really pick banded mongooses?

When a SpaceX ship carries four astronauts — three from NASA and one from Japan’s Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) — to the International Space Station, the ISS will be so crowded that astronaut and mission commander Mike Hopkins will have to sleep in the SpaceX capsule. Or is this a subtle way to tell Hopkins that he snores?

Surrey University molecular geneticist Johnjoe McFadden outlines in a new paper his theory that consciousness is actually the energy field of the brain and humans are actually a combination of matter and energy, making consciousness an entirely physical, measurable, and artificially pliable physical structure.

A huge ancient fossil lakebed discovered under the northwestern part of the Greenland Ice Sheet is estimated to be millions of years old, once measured 7,100 sq. km., 2,741 sq. miles), contained 580 cubic km (139 cubic miles) of water, and may hold sedimentary records from the time when Greenland was ice-free. Let’s hope researchers can study it before Greenland becomes ice-free again.

Biologists from the Amphibian Disease Laboratory at the University of Tennessee are searching desperately for ways to stop a deadly skin-eating fungus (Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans) from entering the U.S. and the salamander-filled Appalachian Mountains via the international pet trade. Is that tiny knocking sound on Dr. Fauci’s door terrified salamanders?

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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