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An Ex-Military Officer, UFO Conspiracies, and Alien Bio-Robots

The world of ufology sometimes seems to be littered with various insiders and whistleblowers stepping forth out of the shadows to bring forward amazing and sensational inside information. Such stories are a dime a dozen in the field, and often pose as a minefield of bold claims and often contradictory information that sometimes leave us even more lost than we already were. Many of these claimed informants come to us with solid reputations and backgrounds, making it even harder to parse out what is really going on. One of these must certainly be an ex-Army officer, who claims to have been heavily involved with reverse engineering alien tech in the wake of the Roswell UFO crash, and who claims that the aliens that people from all around the world have reported seeing aren’t what they seem to be.

The history and credentials of Philip James Corso don’t read like those of a lunatic or quack. After joining the U.S. Army in 1942, he served as an intelligence officer in Europe before going on to become chief of the US Counter Intelligence Corps in Rome, and through all of this he carved out a reputation as a bit of a war hero when he arranged for the safe passage of 10,000 Jewish World War II refugees out of Rome to the British Mandate of Palestine, and he was also made the personal emissary to Giovanni Battista Montini at the Vatican. In later years he served in the Korean War as well, acting as Chief of the Special Projects branch of the Intelligence Division, Far East Command, keeping track of POW camps in North Korea, and he would go on to serve on the staff of President Eisenhower’s National Security Council from 1953 to 1957, before in 1961 becoming the Chief of the Pentagon’s Foreign Technology desk in Army Research and Development. Pretty impressive credentials, indeed, but he would also go on to become firmly entrenched in the field of ufology, and make some rather spectacular claims that have remained controversial and which threaten to overshadow his eminent military accomplishments.

Philip James Corso

In the 1990s, Corso suddenly became intensely interested in the UFO phenomena, and in 1997 published a book called The Day After Roswell, in which he chronicles his involvement in dealing with extraterrestrial technology recovered from the infamous UFO crash at Roswell, New Mexico in 1947. In the bestselling book, he would claim that Roscoe H. Hillenkoetter, the first director of Central Intelligence, had put together a top-secret group tasked with studying retrieved alien technology for the purpose of reverse engineering it for corporate use, which he claims led to such remarkable innovations as fiber optics, lasers, transistors, night vision devices, integrated circuit chips, and Kevlar material, all gleaned from alien tech. Other claims he made were that the “Star Wars” Strategic Defense Initiative was not only to engage incoming enemy warheads, but also to fight off hostile alien spacecraft, that the government was hiding the truth about UFOs and aliens in order to profit from it in the lucrative tech-sector, and also that the alien bodies of the “Grey” aliens that were found at Roswell, also called “Zeta Reticulans,” were not biological entities at all, but rather “Bio robots.” Wait, what?

Corso would go in to some detail about how alien bodies actually had been recovered from the Roswell crash, but that an examination of them showed that they did not seem to be actual biological lifeforms at all, but rather engineered “bio machines” that were created by their alien masters for the purpose of carrying out the arduous long-distance missions to other worlds, sort of like very elaborate and sophisticated drones. He cited several pieces of supposed evidence that supported this claim, such as that the aliens had devices implanted within them to allow them to directly connect to their spacecraft, and that they had no normal internal organs and a complete lack of any digestive system, among others. He would elaborate:

Perhaps we should consider these UBOs (extraterrestrial biological objects), as indicated in autopsy reports, as humanoid robots, and not as life forms specifically designed for traveling long distances in space and time. Although doctors could not understand how their body works in terms of chemistry, they found that it did not contain any basic elements unknown to people. Of particular interest was the liquid that served in their place of blood. In these biological objects, the circulatory and lymphatic systems were combined. If there was any kind of nutrient exchange in these systems, then it could only occur through the skin or some external protective coating that they wore, because they did not have a digestive system or a way through which the remnants of food leave the body.

Corso claimed that all aliens that had been encountered by abductees had likely actually been these bio-robots, and that the real alien overseers had never directly been to Earth at all. It was one of the more eyebrow-raising of his claims among many, and the book made a lot of waves at the time. Corso was invited to talk on the paranormal talk programs Dreamland and Coast to Coast, where he talked with the legendary Art Bell about his strange experiences and shed a little more light on it all. Of course, there were detractors as well, with The Guardian including the book in its list of “Top Ten literary hoaxes” in 2001. The book has generated some debate and doubt even within the ufology field, with many dismissing it as half-fiction at best, but it has also served to generate discussion on Roswell and government cover-ups, further fueled when Corso himself suddenly died of a heart attack on July 16, 1998, less than a year after his book was published. Coincidence or government silencing campaign? Who knows?

We are left to ask, is any of this true? There is very little to verify or independently corroborate any of it, leaving us with quite the amazing story with no way to prove it true or false. What we do know is that Corso has impeccable credentials, so it would seem odd for him to just make it all up. Is that what is going on here? There is no way for us to know, the book has been seen as extremely controversial even within the UFO field, and whether any of it is true or not, it is still a damn strange, wild ride at the very least.