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Ghosts Alone Can’t Keep Dudley’s Haunted Station Hotel Open

Most old mining towns had a railway station which, if there was enough traffic, had a hotel nearby. Dudley (or Duddeley) was a booming mining town in the West Midlands of west-central England that was once the center of the Black Country – so called because of the air darkened by the coal mines, coking, iron foundries, glass factories, brickworks and steel mills. Dudley’s railway station was opened in 1850 and The Station Hotel in 1896. It was demolished and expanded in 1936 and eventually acquired the ghosts that made it a popular site for tourists, wedding parties (really!) and paranormal investigations – the last helped designate it one of the most haunted locations in England. Unfortunately, even ghosts can’t fight the effects of the economy and the pandemic, so the famed, once glamorous Dudley Station Hotel has closed. Before it’s demolished for good, let’s give its ghosts one 15 minutes of fame.

Always check around before checking in at a haunted hotel.

Higgypop.com says the Station Hotel ghost stories include reports of poltergeist activity (including knives being thrown), eerie feelings, disembodied voices, and sightings of a man in black nicknamed George, a lady in white and others. The hotel’s website gives the background of the hotel’s most famous ghost story, and the television psychic who identified the spirit.

“When ‘Most Haunted’s’ resident psychic Derek Accora came to the hotel, he reported the name of a male spirit George Williams/Williamson whom was having an affair with a female by the name of Elizabeth Hitchen. George Williams allegedly murdered Elizabeth by strangling and stabbing her. Accora then revealed that Williams disposed of Elizabeth’s body by means of a chute within the hotel, which would have been used, at the time, for the delivery of bottles and barrels. Williams was then reported to have buried the body near the front of the hotel. According to Derek Accora, Elizabeth Hitchen’s body remains there.”

Poor Elizabeth

Nice guy, that George – no wonder poor Elizabeth still haunts the place. Allegedly, so does the spirit of another George — George Lawley, who knew about the murder and documented it in a ledger that he hid – a ledger that was never found. The murder happened in the original hotel and the manager was hanged for the crime, so it’s doubtful that the body in a barrel is still on the grounds, but plenty of witnesses swear the ghosts still are. Derek Accora also claimed to pick up the presence of ghosts of children – a girl run over by a carriage and a boy who died from a blood disease.

Every haunted hotel has at least one known haunted room and the Station House’s is Room 214, where a spirit is often seen waiting for something and the Most Haunted’s night vision camera caught a chair and the bed seemingly moving.

“It is with a heavy heart Helen, Chris and our amazing team have to announce that The Station Hotel has been sold and now ceased trading. At this sad time we would like to thank all our valued customers over the years, whatever the occasion it has been a great honour to welcome all of you. Thank you once again for your support and stay safe.”

While the ghosts are still there, the guests aren’t, so the owners announced this week on social media that the Station Hotel has been sold. While it’s rumored to be scheduled for demolishing, some commenters are hoping it will be turned into apartments.

Good luck renting Apt. 214!

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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