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Hubble Hobbled, Robotic Tattooing, Ghost Hunting Gear and More Mysterious News Briefly — March 10, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — March 10, 2021

Researchers in Japan discovered two species of sea slug (Elysia marginate and Elysia atroviridis) that can decapitate themselves and then grow two new sea slugs from the head and body. Think how different history might have been if this was known by Henry VIII.

Scientists at the University of Illinois-Chessie Creek Farm Tropical-Adapted Cattle Project have successfully bred cows that thrive in hot climates and produce 10 times the milk of local breeds, which will help the beef and milk industries to expand rapidly in developing countries. Who would have thought the deep state included the Burger King and the Dairy Queen?

A team at Australia’s University of New South Wales-Sydney created a ‘bio-ink’ gel that contains a patient’s live bone cells in a calcium phosphate solution, allowing them to 3D-print human bones at room temperature just minutes before they’re needed to implant in a patient. 3D-printed bones sounds like every dog’s birthday wish.

A new study on the history of the Milky Way found that the best time and place to live in our galaxy is not here and now but over 6 billion years ago on its outer edges, when there were less cosmic explosions that could destroy all life on Earth. Do any life forms from back then still live there now or has it become too gentrified?

If you’re interested in getting into the ghost hunting business, paranormal investigator  Dominick Mondelli is retiring after over 30 years running Ghost Hunters of Southside Tidewater (G.H.O.S.T.) and selling all of his equipment – including a K-II Meter Deluxe EMF Detector, an infrared thermometer and five CCTV cameras. Coincidentally, this will also tell you if the ghost you found has coronavirus symptoms.

Former NASA deputy administrator Lori Garver says she thinks NASA should get out of the rocket-building business and turn it over to SpaceX. Before the organization makes any rash decisions, someone should check to see if Elon Musk has secretly learned ventriloquism.

According to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports, fossils found in Gnirshöhle cave in southwest Germany contain “almost the entire breadth of genetic diversity of all contemporary and ancient dogs and most wolves” and may be evidence of the world’s earliest domesticated wolves. The clincher would be a pair of chewed-up prehistoric slippers.

NASA’s most recent shipment to the International Space Station included 120,000 Caenorhabditis elegans worms (roundworms) which will spend their time navigating a miniature obstacle course to help scientists study how space causes the loss of muscle mass in astronauts. It will also give astronauts something to watch if their cable goes out.

To demonstrate the capacity of 5G to handle loads of data with no latency, T-Mobile Netherlands teamed up with a technologist to create a robot that allowed a tattoo artist to give tattoos from a remote location. This sounds like the perfect cool excuse to use when explaining to friends why your tattoo is misspelled.

The Hubble Space Telescope, which has been taking fabulous pictures since 1990, is currently in safe mode due to an onboard software error – a problem which doesn’t have NASA publicly worried even though it’s happened before. Not worrying about 30-year-old software is like not worrying when the phone company tech shows up with dials, jacks and wire strippers.

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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