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Senator Marco Rubio and Billionaire Elon Musk Weigh in on UFOs and Aliens

When it comes to UFOs and space aliens, who are you going to believe – a politician or a billionaire? Why would you believe EITHER of them? We’ll ask that question again later, but first … let’s hear what Florida senator Marco Rubio, the chairperson of the Senate Committee on Intelligence, and Elon Musk, the billionaire owner of Tesla and SpaceX, have to say on these subjects. Senator?

“I think the worry is that there’s stuff flying over our facilities and we don’t know what they are. You know what I mean? So that’s the concern. Maybe it’s the other logical explanation to it.”

Senator Marco Rubio

Senator Rubio made that comment to a TMZ reporter a Reagan International Airport this week. Rubio has expressed this same concern before about UFOs and UAPs flying over or around U.S. military installations and ships that cannot be identified as being ours or theirs – nor whether the “theirs” is earthly or extraterrestrial. It’s a little disconcerting that the senator has been a ranking member of the Intelligence Committee for years and can’t get this information … unless his complaints are a smokescreen to distract the public from what he really knows. Rubio said last year that he’d prefer to find out the UFOs contain ETs and not Chinese pilots, but that could be political talk. The senator also was responsible for the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 containing an addition requesting the Director of National Intelligence to produce a report detailing any and all information it and other agencies have on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAPs) and “advanced aerial threats.” Does it sound like he thinks there’s something alien in those files?

Turning now to Elon Musk …

“Strongest argument against aliens.”

That “argument” – announced in a March 22 tweet by Musk – is a graph plotting the development of ‘camera resolution’ since the invention of the device, a fast-climbing curve, and ‘UFO picture resolution’, a flat line over the same period. That may be an exaggeration, although not by much when one eliminates all of the fakes and obvious hoaxes. The tweet appears to be in response to a recent well-publicized report last month by two American Airlines pilots of a UFO over New Mexico – a report that did not include photos … blurry or otherwise. The FAA issued a statement saying in essence “Nothing to see here, move along” and Freedom of Information requests by researchers have not been honored as of this writing. Musk is a space travel wannabe and is painfully aware – both in witnessing rocket explosions and in his back account dropping – of how difficult it is. That explains his comments to podcaster Joe Rogan last month on the existence of extraterrestrials:

“If they wanted us to know they would they could just show up and walk down Main Street and say ‘Hey I’m an alien. check me out,’ you know.”

SpaceX launched 18 rockets in 2017, all of which were successful.

SpaceX launch

Sounds like Musk believes aliens would act like he probably plans to do – tell everyone in earshot that he’s from another planet and isn’t that special. That and his recent graph are cynical versions of the Fermi Paradox – if intelligent space travelers exist, where are they … and why can’t anyone get a clear photo of them?

Time to ask the questions again. When it comes to UFOs and space aliens, who are you going to believe – Marco Rubio, a politician, or Elon Musk, a billionaire? Why would you believe EITHER of them? If you plot believability on a graph, Musk might curve slightly more than Rubio, but still pretty close to a flat line. However, the amount of attention both get when it comes to UFOs and space aliens makes a comment by Rubio one that should apply to him and Musk:

“So that’s the concern.”

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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