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Steamboat Geyser, Lunar Gravity Simulator, DMT Testing and More Mysterious News Briefly — March 16, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — March 16, 2021 

Scientists from the University of Utah took an opposite-direction look at Yellowstone’s Steamboat geyser – the world’s tallest active geyser – into its subsurface plumbing structure and found that the geyser is more than 325 feet (100 meters) deep. If you think they did this by convincing the lowest-ranking scientists to stick his head over the hole, look in, drop a coin and count until it hits bottom, you’ve spent too much pandemic time watching Roadrunner cartoons.

A new look at an ice core from a mile-deep hole dug up by U.S. Army scientists in northwestern Greenland in 1966 as part of Project Iceworm, a covert mission to build a subsurface base concealing hundreds of nuclear warheads pointed at the Soviet Union, found fragments of fossilized plants that may have bloomed there on ice-free land a million years ago and as recently as within the last few hundred thousand years. “Did they find any missiles?” asked anxious Russians.

A banana breeding tracking tool called BTracT was developed by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) to collect real-time data on pest resistance, plant stature, color and feel of cooked bananas to store in a global banana breeding database called MusaBase. It’s time to worry if the scientists start talking about a master banana race.

A French-Norwegian archaeological team recently discovered ruins of an early Christian monastery dating back to the 5th century CE in Egypt’s Western Desert. No word yet on whether the monks were making cheese, distilling brandy or baking fruitcakes.

After declaring his new corporate title is “Technoking,” Tesla CEO Elon Musk uploaded a techno track about non-fungible tokens (NFT) that he’s selling as an NFT. When is this guy leaving for Mars and is that soon enough?

NASA is working with Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin to build a lunar gravity simulator by 2022 which will allow astronauts to train in Moon gravity conditions (one-sixth of Earth) for extended periods of time. No, future Alan Shepards, it won’t be big enough to swing a golf club … yet.

While searching for whale DNA in Breaker Bay off the coast of New Zealand, Wilderlab scientists were shocked to find kangaroo DNA instead, which was eventually traced to dog food made from kangaroo sold at nearby supermarkets. If you return from snorkeling with an added spring in your step, now you know why.

Pet owners long puzzled by why dogs and cats suddenly tear around the house for no apparent reason finally have a reason – new research has identified this as frenetic random activity periods (FRAPs) which are nothing more than animals having a good time like their wild counterparts do. Does this apply to alligators? (Asking for a reptile-loving friend.)

Neuralink co-founder and President Max Hodak says we’re going to need a better term than ‘video games’ for the next generation of entertainment systems based on neural implants and brain-computer interfaces. Before you answer — what if we already have the implants and this is a test to see if they’re working?

The British company Small Pharma is testing DMT – the “spirit molecule” that is a known hallucinogen and the active ingredient in ayahuasca – to determine if it can help relieve depression by loosening the brain’s fixed pathways, which can then be “reset” with talking therapy afterwards. The tough part is reassuring volunteers that no violent projective vomiting is involved.

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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