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Home Depot Exorcism, Scorching Siberia, Arctic Dinosaurs and More Mysterious News Briefly — June 25, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — June 25, 2021

Police in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, were called to a Home Depot where they broke up an exorcism in the lumber aisle which participants claimed they were holding for the dead trees. A few were disappointed when the store had no lubricants to help their heads spin around.

Researchers at the Joint Genome Institute and Stanford University in California have identified 54,118 species of virus living in the human gut and feces – 92 percent of which were previously unknown – but assures us that the great majority of these are bacteriophage viruses that “eat” bacteria and can’t attack human cells. Isn’t that the plot of every Michael Crichton novel?

A new study of sharks that live off the coast of southern Florida found that the most common species swimming in those waters is the nurse shark, followed by the blacktip, lemon and bull shark. Is number six snowbird personal injury lawyers?

A team of scientists from ETH Zurich demonstrated a passive conical device that works 24/7 to create water from humid air that captured 0.05 liters (1.8 fluid ounces) per square meter of surface area per hour or around 1.2 liters (1.25 quarts) per square meter per day, or about a third of a person’s required daily intake. Why didn’t we save those giant satellite dishes from the 80s?

Hundreds of fossils from very young dinosaurs recovered from northern Alaska — including duck-billed, horned and T-Rex dinosaurs – made the arctic their year-round 70 million years ago, with some surviving by hibernating and others because they were warm-blooded. Young Arctic tyrannosauruses probably looked at Arctic hornbills as a frozen treat on a stick.

Temperature tracking satellites Copernicus Sentinel-3A and Sentinel-3B captured a snapshot of land surface temperatures in Siberia on June 20, and they showed a peak ground temperature of 118 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius) near Verkhojansk, a small town usually known for its extreme cold temperatures. “I told you it wasn’t hot flashes,” said every wife in Verkhojansk.

A rare cancer-like parasitic disease caused by the Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworm has appeared in North America which researchers believe were brought over by dogs from Europe – thus they recommend washing your hands after handling your dog, and washing your locally-grown food if you live in a coyote area. Where is that almost-full giant bottle of Purell you quit using?

Fossils found in the Seto Inland Sea of the Japanese archipelago are from a 3,000-year-old victim of a shark attack – making this the earliest direct evidence for a shark attack on a human. Was there a clay beer vessel his friends held while he tried to win a bet he could pet a shark?

The tiny European robin makes long-distance migrations which a new study pins on the bird’s  ability to use a quantum relationship between two electrons in a certain protein to see light that signals different strengths of Earth’s magnetic field to keep them on course as they cross Europe. What do they use to keep the robins from the back of the flying flock formation from asking “Are you sure you know where you’re going?”

Invasive gypsy moth caterpillars are so bad in Ontario this year, some joggers avoid running in parks for fear of being pooped on while many people claim they can hear the millions of worms chewing on leaves. We saw The Loud Caterpillars open for Iron Butterfly.

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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