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Spider Apocalypse, Black Hole Storms, Murder Hornets and More Mysterious News Briefly — June 17, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — June 17, 2021

If you’re looking for some crayfish that will jump into your gumbo pot or taunt the fish you’re casting it to catch, new research suggest using crawdads from waters contaminated with antidepressants because they act more “boldly,” emerging from hiding more quickly and spend longer looking for food. If you see one crawl out of the pot, turn up the heat and hand you a bottle of hot sauce, he’s on something stronger.

Astronomers have discovered light from a massive black hole storm 13.1 billion years ago, when the Universe was less than 10 percent of its current age, that may be the earliest example of galactic wind ever seen. Coming soon to a theater near you – Black-hole-nado!

A white variegated Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma, an extremely rare houseplant with just nine leaves sold this week on a New Zealand auction site for a record-breaking $19,528 (£14,000). Plant fans around the world are hoping the buyer wasn‘t a single guy who’s never home.

Australians battling a mouse plague being described as ‘biblical’ are now waking up every morning to blankets of spider webs covering the entire countryside – including road signs, cars and sheds — in what is being called a “spider apocalypse.” Desperate Aussies are offering to buy a lifetime supply of beer to anyone named Moses holding a magic staff.

J.J. Abrams is producing “UFO,” a four-part docu-series for Showtime that will look at the phenomenon of mysterious objects in the sky and “what clandestine influence the American government, lucrative private companies and the military may have in shielding the truth behind extraterrestrial phenomena to further their own agendas.” Since it’s being made for a lucrative private company, what are the odds you’ll learn something new versus the odds it will be followed by an endless series of four-part sequels?

Marine scientists have developed an autonomous underwater robot called Mesobot that can track elusive underwater creatures in the mesopelagic zone without disturbing them. Aliens living in deep sea bases already have a nickname for these Mesobots – underwater Navy planes.

The Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) is much-studied roadside weed, but scientists recently discovered it has a previously unknown body part called the ‘cantil’, which connects to the stem at one end and hangs in the air to hold up the flower-bearing stalk, similar to the function of a cantilever in structural engineering. The body part this roadside plant really wants is a middle finger to give to people who still toss trash out of their car windows.

Scientists at the Australian National University and Nottingham Trent University have developed plans for an ultra-thin crystal film that can be applied to eyeglasses to help people see in the dark by converting infrared light into visible images. As expected, most people can’t wait to be able to walk and text in the dark.

The first Asian giant “murder” hornet of 2021 was discovered north of Seattle and entomologists say it appears to be unrelated to the 2019 and 2020 findings of the hornets near the U.S.-Canadian border and they have no idea how it got there. Murderer Uber?

A new study found that the traditional eight-hour workday is far too long – most people can only concentrate on something for a maximum of five hours. Lose concentration after only five hours? I find that hard t…

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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