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When Cryptozoology and Ufology Clash in the Strangest Ways

My previous article was on the subject of the Bigfoot-UFO connection. It’s important to note, however, that Bigfoot is not the only cryptozoological creature that has been tied to aliens. Take, for example, the matter of the mysterious Dogmen. There’s no doubt that the leading researcher in the field of the Dogman is Linda Godfrey. And, interestingly, Linda has a relevant story to tell about the Dogmen; a story that ties the creatures to aliens.  In 2005, Linda was contacted by a man – a military whistle-blower, we might say – who was an expert in the field of remote-viewing. According to Linda’s Edward Snowden-like source, the U.S. Government has uncovered data suggesting that the werewolf-like Dogmen are a very ancient, alien race that closely resembles a certain ancient deity of the Underworld. And who might that be? It’s Anubis, that’s who. Linda’s informant also discovered – via remote-viewing – that the Dogmen can “jump” from location to location via portals or doorways in the fabric of space and time. Wormholes, we might say. That’s quite a story told to Linda.

Moving on: between the nights of December 26 and 29, 1980, multiple, extraordinary events of the UFO kind occurred within Rendlesham Forest, Suffolk, England. They were events that involved military personnel from the nearby Royal Air Force stations of Bentwaters and Woodbridge. Since that now long gone period, countless U.S. Air Force personnel, who were stationed in the area at the time, have spoken out regarding their knowledge of a small, triangular-shaped object that was seen maneuvering in the forest. Others described seeing in the dark woods almost ghostly, extraterrestrial-type beings of short size and with eerie, feline-like eyes. Strange and unknown lights were seen dancing around the night skies, circling both the forest and the twin military facilities. There were stories that the amazing movements of the UFOs were caught on radar. There is, however, something else: a strange creature seen in the very same forest.

Rendlesham Forest, as well as the Suffolk locales of West Wratting and Balsham, is reportedly home to something equally as strange – maybe even far more so – than a vehicle and creatures from another world. It is a beast that, locally, has come to be known as the Shug Monkey. Described as being a bizarre combination of giant dog, muscular bear, and large ape, the creature is said to take its name from either (A) an old English word – scucca – which means demon, and which, as we have seen already, also has a link to the naming of Shugborough Hall, Staffordshire; or (B) an old east-coast term – shucky – that translates, into modern day terminology, as hairy or shaggy. Maybe the name is even born out of a curious melding of both terms. But, whatever the true nature of the name applied to the foul, hairy entity, its presence in the woods of Suffolk is enough to strike deep terror into the hearts of those souls unfortunate enough to have crossed its path.

Now, let’s take a trip to Loch Ness, Scotland – the home of the legendary Nessies. Just like the Bigfoot creatures, the Dogmen and the Shug Monkey, the Loch Ness Monsters have connections to UFOs. On August 13, 1971, a notable encounter occurred at Loch Ness. Not with a monster, but with a UFO. The witness was one Graham Snape, who told Nessie-seeker Ted Holiday that he saw an unidentified object crossing the skies above Loch Ness in a left to right fashion, quickly, and with not even a bit of accompanying noise. The somewhat circular-shaped UFO was purple with a white center. By his own admission, Snape was unsure of the size of the object but suggested it was around five-feet in diameter. More Loch Ness weirdness hit the news in 2011, specifically in August of that year. The UK’s Daily Express newspaper splashed a headline across its pages that read: “Alert as UFO is sighted over Loch Ness.” The story was, undoubtedly, an odd one. That something occurred does not appear to be in doubt. It is, however, the nature of the “something” that remains open to debate. It was on the night of August 20, 2011 that a number of people –many being completely independent of each other – encountered something unusual in the skies over Loch Ness.

Witness descriptions of the movements of the object fell into two camps: those who said they saw it descending into the loch and those who maintained it was actually hovering above the expansive waters. As for the appearance of the UFO, it very much depended on who one asked. But, whatever it was, it quickly caught the attention of the emergency services, who were contacted by worried locals. Martin Douglas, of the Loch Ness Life Boat crew, told the Daily Mail that someone in the area had seen what, superficially at least, resembled a microlight or a hang-glider, and which actually seemed to enter the loch in a controlled flight. Oddly, however, others who saw the unknown craft described it as being somewhat balloon-shaped. Then there were those who opined it looked eerily like a fully-open parachute.  There was, then, no real, solid consensus on what was seen – or on what wasn’t seen.

And, of course, there’s the Mothman of Point Pleasant, West Virginia that plagued the area from 1966 to 1967. The red-eyed, winged thing was not the only strange thing seen in and around the city. Men in Black prowled around, terrifying witnesses to UFOs and the Mothman itself. What all of this tells us (including the information in my Bigfoot-UFO article) is that, like it or not, where strange, cryptozoological creatures are seen, so are UFOs. Somewhere there’s an answer to all of this, but outright denying the reality of these weird connections between UFOs, aliens and monsters will get us nowhere. In fact, it will push us back, rather than forward.

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Nick Redfern works full time as a writer, lecturer, and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. Nick has written 41 books, writes for Mysterious Universe and has appeared on numerous television shows on the The History Channel, National Geographic Channel and SyFy Channel.
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