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Shapeshifting Birds, Fake Internet, Colorized Thylacine and More Mysterious News Briefly — September 8, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — September 8, 2021

The SpaceX rocket that will launch the first all-tourist crew into orbit on September 14th has been spotted on its launchpad at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The commander of this Inspiration4 mission is billionaire Jared Isaacman, proving once again that if something goes into space and there’s no billionaire on it, it doesn’t count.

Bird researcher Sara Ryding of Deakin University in Australia says climate change is causing birds to shapeshift and develop larger beaks, legs, and ears to better regulate their body temperatures as the planet gets hotter. If your parakeet suddenly looks like a thunderbird, it’s too late.

Billionaire former Walmart executive Marc Lore has outlined his vision for a 5-million-person “new city in America” and is scouting desert locations for it in Nevada, Utah, Arizona and  Texas. Let’s hope he doesn’t model after Walmart and fill it with people wearing clothes inappropriate for public exposure.

An Australian film archive released colorized footage of a black-and-white film of the last known Tasmanian tiger or thylacine, showing Benjamin at a zoo in Hobart, Tasmania, in 1933, just three years before he died, making the Tasmanian tiger species extinct. Going from black-and-white to color makes Benjamin the true Wizard of Oz.

Authorities in Clarksville, Tennessee, still can’t explain a large boom and bright light on September 5th that witnesses said shook the ground yet didn’t register on seismic equipment and no military testing was reported. Was it aliens trying to fit in but confused between Labor Day and the 4th of July?

A new study warns that a massive solar storm like the solar flares that hit the Earth in the 1800s and early 1900s could cut off entire continents from the Internet for days or even months by damaging the undersea communications cables. Imagine millions roaming the streets looking for advice on what to wear and people with books.

The Chang’e-5 orbiter, which returned moon rocks to Earth and then sat at a Lagrange point for six months, seems to suddenly be heading back to the Moon, possibly to use a lunar flyby to set itself toward 49219 Kamo’oalewa, an asteroid that China plans to explore during a 2024 asteroid sample return mission. Is this a test mining mission or a test food delivery mission?

After it was revealed that Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos invested millions in a mysterious anti-aging research startup in Silicon Valley, fellow billionaire space entrepreneur Elon Musk tweeted “And if it doesn’t work, he’s gonna sue death!” To which Bezos must have fumed, “Damn, that was supposed to be a secret!”

Staff at the 10,000-foot Mount Tillis, one of Switzerland’s most popular Alpine skiing destinations, have been covering its glacier slopes with giant fleece blankets to keep them from melting under warming global temperatures. Local sheep think this should qualify them for free lift tickets.

A popular conspiracy theory posits that the Internet died in 2016 or early 2017 and what we’re using today was created by an AI, propagated by bots, and possibly aided by a group of “influencers” on the payroll of various corporations working with the government solely to get us to buy more stuff. So maybe a killer solar storm (see above) is a good thing.

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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