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Speed Toading, Hypersonic Martian Drone, Killer Vultures and More Mysterious News Briefly — September 16, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — September 16, 2021

Tulum, Mexico, has become the new go-to place to participate in “speed-toading” — smoking the powerful hallucinogenic venom of the Bufo alvarius (a.k.a. Colorado River toad or the Sonoran Desert toad) on short one-hour stays at hotels that appear to be more motivated by profit than efforts to provide holistic transformational journeys with experienced practitioners. Stick with speed dating – it has the same frustrations, brief elations and possible vomiting.

‘Rozy’ — a virtual human created last year by Sidus Studio X – is now a major AI social media influencer sensation with eight exclusive contracts and more than 100 sponsorships, and is expected to make over $850,000 by the end of the year. If you’re still trying to figure out Zoom, it’s time for your medication Gramps.

The myths of ritual human sacrifices in the Silla Kingdom, which ruled a united Korea for much of the first millennium CE, have become reality with archaeological excavations at the ancient Silla palace of Wolseong in Gyeongju, South Korea, uncovering evidence confirming that human sacrifices took place there during the structure’s construction phase in the fourth century CE. Time for ‘Indiana Jones and the Temple of Wolseong’?

It’s no surprise that giant American alligators will eat anything, but butchers cutting up a 13.4-foot, 750-pound Mississippi alligator earlier this year were shocked to find two ancient Native American artifacts, a 1,700-BCE plummet stone and a 6,000-BCE atlatl dart point, in its stomach. The height of irony would be to make a gator-skin pouch to carry them in.

The South China Morning Post reports that the country’s space engineers are working on a hypersonic Martian drone that could travel at five times the speed of sound across the Red Planet. Will Martians call them Earth Tic-Tacs?

The latest cattle mutilators plaguing Midwest ranchers are impatient federally protected black vultures (Coragyps atratus) that are reportedly eating live cows and newborn calves in Kentucky, Ohio, Missouri, Oklahoma and other states. Forget the legendary Thunderbirds – it’s time to fear the real Plunderirds.

There’s now an island bigger than Australia – a new study using satellite data found a giant phytoplankton bloom larger than the entirety of Australia located in the northernmost waters of the Southern Ocean, to the south east of Australia, that was caused by the huge Australian bushfires of the summer of 2019/2020. Get worried when the plankton apply for membership to the U.N.

New Zealand National MP Maureen Pugh says she’s been struck by lightning three times – once so powerfully it cooked her flesh and another time leaving her like “a vegetable” for six weeks. Could lightning strikes explain the U.S. Congress? Time for a lightning rod on the Capitol Building?

Staff at the True’s Yard Museum in King’s Lynn had a bomb scare recently when someone found a mysterious wooden box one recent morning – but it turned out to be a motion-activated music box that is presumably meant to begin playing when a ghost is nearby that was accidentally left behind by an unnamed paranormal investigation team. That sound you hear is Dan Aykroyd face-palming.

A Norwegian company called OceanTherm wants to use bubbles fed from perforated pipes below ships to cool down sea temperatures in order to cut off a hurricane’s supply of warm water and stop it before it strengthens – a miles-wide process that could work but cause other environmental problems. Have any of these scientists ever been in a bubbling hot tub?

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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