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Volcanic Bitcoin, Ghost Dog, Bigfoot Calls and More Mysterious News Briefly — October 4, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — October 4, 2021

El Salvador, the first country to declare bitcoin as legal tender, has officially begun to mine Bitcoin using the power harnessed from the Santa Ana volcano and the so-called “volcanode” has mined about $269 so far. This could be the worse idea since a tourist in Pompei said, “We’ll leave after the fireworks show.”

Engineers at the University of Waterloo combined two existing deep-learning AI techniques to help commentators, reporters and fans identify players by their sweater numbers with 90-per-cent accuracy. If you want help seeing the puck, call the University of Waterloo School of Optometry.

A new study of 6,000 adults in the U.S., UK, and Mexico found that 81% said they had experienced flatulence in the past 24 hours, while 60% said they had a rumbling stomach, and 58% had belched. The survey was conducted by researchers from the Rome Foundation and your dog.

Archaeologists on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi found a human jawbone that belonged to someone who lived approximately 25,000 years ago, making it the oldest fossilized human remains ever found on the island, dating modern humans in Indonesia to the late Pleistocene era before the end of the last Ice Age. The teeth were in bad shape – did the human come to Sulawesi in search of floss?

A research team found a ‘hyper-eye’ system in trilobites from the Devonian period 390 million years ago in which about 200 large lenses in each eye spanned at least six individual facets, each of which in turn formed its own small compound eye. It probably came in handy for seeing in the ocean depths before the evolution of lanternfish.

If you’re not worried about climate change yet, researchers say Arctic ice melting will probably release ancient or undiscovered viruses and bacteria, toxic chemicals, and nuclear waste from Soviet nuclear tests. Can we ever return to the old days when the only things coming back to haunt us were ghosts?

The ESA’s BepiColombo probe successfully flew at a minimum distance of 199 kilometers above the surface of Mercury and sent back pictures and other scientific data. Why can we get that close to Mercury but not to the stadium before the big game?

The Juno spacecraft currently orbiting Jupiter found giant ammonia “mushballs” – liquidy hailstones of ammonia – in its atmosphere that could explain where the ammonia on Neptune and Uranus is hiding. And Giant Ammonia Mushballs would be a great name for a band.

The winner of the annual Whitehall Sasquatch Festival and Calling Contest this year was Grant Kennedy, whose call was deemed most Sasquatch-like by the crowd. Real proof of authenticity would be if Bigfoot tracks found after the contest were pointed towards or away from the event.

A woman in Arizona claims a photo taken by her home security camera shows the ghost of her beloved dog, which had died a month before, still standing guard at her side. Did it disappear after seeing the ghost of a squirrel?

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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