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Annoying Martian Tourists, Brain Keyboarding, Vulcan’s Hammer and More Mysterious News Briefly — November 10, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — November 10, 2021

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology activated certain combinations of brain neurons in healthy mice and watched them develop inflammation problems – demonstrating how the brain can create physical illnesses anywhere in the body and may potentially be able to stop them with neuron tweaking. Does this mean some of your aches and pains are due to too much face-palming?

E. coli usually causes problems, but a new study found it can solve problems too –E. coli bacteria solved a classic computational maze problem using distributed computing to divide the work among different types of genetically engineered cells like a bacterial computer. Kind of gives new meaning to the term ‘computer bug’.

If you’ve ever scratched your chin and wondered why you have a chin to scratch, a new study suggests that ancient humans had larger heads, but as humans began living in close social groups, their testosterone levels dropped, shrinking their heads first but leaving the larger chins that will eventually shrink away as well. Jay Leno wonders if he should feel proud or insulted.

Dr. Shannon Rupert, the director of the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), says the Martian simulation camp in remote southern Utah has been jeopardized by tourists who think nothing of flying camera-equipped drones outside windows, wandering around the facility, poking their heads in buildings and bothering the test astronauts. It didn’t bother the castaways on “Gilligan’s Island,” did it?

Philip K. Dick’s dystopian novel “Vulcan’s Hammer” is being made into a movie about a world after a devastating world war that turned global governance to the “Vulcan” AI system whose  algorithms dictate policies for the ruling party to carry out. Will Mark Zuckerberg want a credit?

Just in time for the switch out of Daylight Saving Time in the U.S., a new sleep study found that the optimal time to fall asleep if one wants a healthy cardiovascular system is between 10-11 pm., with the worst time being after midnight. This could explain why the study got scant coverage on your late-night news programs.

NASA announced it will delay the Artemis mission to send humans back to the moon until at least 2025 and blamed the decision in part on Jeff Bezos and his fight over the lunar lander contract. Good luck getting next-day package delivery to Mission Control.

Astrophysicist Paul Sutter has invoked the Fermi paradox in a new article, suggesting we’ve tried and failed long enough in our search for signs of extraterrestrial intelligent life and should focus on finding non-intelligent life forms instead. This shouldn’t be too hard – we already do it during every election cycle.

A new brain-computer interface developed by Stanford University enabled a man with paralyzed hands to type 90 characters a minute just by thinking about the words, which were then converted into keystrokes by an AI-powered language system with an autocorrect function. “What’s a keystroke?” asked anyone under 20.

The value of Bitcoin hit an all-time high on Tuesday, trading above $68,000 for the first time, and JPMorgan predicts bitcoin will hit $73,000 this year and ultimately reach $146,000. Before you invest, use a real dollar to research “tulip mania.”

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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