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Dead Man Rises, Ghost Dog, Moon Nuclear Plant and More Mysterious News Briefly — November 23, 2021

Mysterious News Briefly — November 23, 2021

The history of electric airplanes may look back on this as a pivotal event –Rolls-Royce’s “Spirit of Innovation” hit a top speed of 387.4 MPH, a speed record for electric airplanes, plus it reached a record top speed of 345.4 MPH over a 3 kilometer (1.86 mile) course and the record lowest time to a 3,000 meter (9,843 feet) altitude (202 seconds) – the records are currently being verified. Does this mean Rolls Royce has finally shed its Grey Poupon image?

A video of security cam footage from Melbourne shows what appears to be a ghost dog chasing after a real one in a fully secured backyard – at least that’s what the owner of the dog and yard claims. The only sure way to tell if it’s real is for the ghost dog to stop and chase a ghost squirrel.

Not all ghost animals are real – police in Essex, England, chased what witnesses claimed was a lion, not a species native to the UK, for 24 hours before deciding it was either a large domestic cat or a large stuffed toy lion. Amusement parks are on the lookout for a guy who’s really good at knocking down milk bottles.

Hot on the heels of NASA’s upcoming launch of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission to crash a spacecraft into the Dimorphos moonlet orbiting the binary near-Earth asteroid (65803) Didymos comes word that the ESA will follow DART with the Hera mission which will send two cubesats to explore the aftermath and make the first ever measurements of an asteroid interior. What’s next – a robot vacuum cleaner mission to pick up the mess?

Contemporary performance artist Nicole Wilson has been replicating on her own body with her own blood the 61 tattoos discovered on the famous 5,000-year-old Ice Age mummy Ötzi the Iceman – because they’re in blood instead of ink, the tattoos have faded but she’s selling prints of them. This may inspire a new book – The Illustrated Man-oh-Man That’s Weird.

NASA announced plans to put a nuclear fission power system on the lunar surface within ten years to run life support systems, charge rovers and power other electrical devices on the Moon. Doesn’t the Moon already look like Chernobyl?

In India, a man who was in a road accident and had been declared dead on arrival by a doctor was found alive in a morgue freezer by his family members the next day – he’s been moved to a hospital where he’s in a coma. Warning to the doctor and the hospital – the iceman’s lawyer cometh.

A newly-identified dinosaur species, Berthasaura leopoldinae, lived in what is now Brazil between 125 and 100 million years ago and is Brazil’s first toothless non-avian theropod – despite having no teeth, the dinosaur was carnivorous. ‘Toothless dinosaur’ is this week’s oxymoron.

Marine biologists have discovered a new octopus species in the shallow waters off southwest Australia and named it the star octopus (Octopus djinda) in honor of the native Nyoongar people who are the traditional custodians of this area. How long before we see an underwater reality show called Dancing with the Star Octopuses?

Scientists at Germany’s University of Göttingen have developed of method to turn popcorn into eco-friendly building insulation that is both fireproof and waterproof. But is it mouse-who-likes-to-watch-movies-through-a-hole-in-your-wall-proof?

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Paul Seaburn is the editor at Mysterious Universe and its most prolific writer. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. His “What in the World!” podcast is a fun look at the latest weird and paranormal news, strange sports stories and odd trivia. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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