May 08, 2022 I Nick Redfern

Aliens or Robots? Our Strange, Enigmatic Visitors

Is it feasible that at least some alien encounters have involved not extraterrestrials, but robots? Let's not dismiss such a controversial scenario. Indeed, there is some data that suggests we should look right in that direction. With that said, let's have a look at a number of cases that fall right into the "robots not aliens" category. We'll begin with a case that is as legendary now as it was back in 1952 when the strange saga took place. On the night of September 12, 1952, something terrifying descended upon the small, West Virginian town of Flatwoods. Precisely what it was remains a mystery to this very day. All that can be said for sure is that it was hideous, fear-inducing and downright monstrous. It has, appropriately, become known as the Flatwoods Monster. Situated in Braxton County and dominated by a mountainous, forested landscape, Flatwoods is a distinctly small town – that much is apparent from the fact that, today, its population is less than four hundred. Back in 1952, it was even less. On the night in question, however, the town found its population briefly added to by one visitor from…well…no-one really knows where.

(Nick Redfern) A legendary robot of the movie-kind: Gort of The Day the Earth Stood Still

It all began as the sun was setting on what was a warm, still, September evening. A group of boys from Flatwoods were playing football in the town’s schoolyard when they were frozen to the spot by the sight of a brightly lit, fiery object that shot overhead, provoking amazement and wonder in the process. All that the boys could be sure of was that the object appeared to be either egg-shaped or circular. Its color fluctuated from orange to fiery red. As the stunned children watched in awe, they saw the object begin to descend - at a high rate of speed, no less – and then appear to come down on one of Flatwood’s largest hilltops. Not surprisingly, being kids, they saw this as a big adventure looming large. The result: they, with a woman named Kathleen May and a recent U.S. Army recruit, Eugene Lemon, headed off for the scene of all the action. It wasn’t long before the group reached the hill in question – and with nightfall rapidly closing in.

The first thing the group noticed, as they reached the darkened peak, was something brightly lit within the trees. What it was, no-one had a clue. But, it clearly wasn’t the lights of a farmhouse, truck, or car. Suddenly, the air was filled with a sickening odor – not unlike that of devilish brimstone. That was not a good sign. To their credit, however, they pushed on, determined to figure out the true nature of the source behind the lights. They soon found out: as the air became filled with a strange, sizzling sound, nothing less than a pair of self-illuminated red eyes could be seen getting ever closer. Kathleen May had the presence of mind to bring a flashlight with her and she quickly focused it on the eyes. In doing so, she also lit up the abominable creature that possessed those fiery eyes. Looming before the now-hysterical band of intrepid souls was an approximately ten-feet-tall, floating monster, which appeared to be humanoid in shape, and which had a large black cowling behind its head – that gave the entire head a kind of “Ace of Spades” appearance - and that was possibly even cloaked. Oddly, its lower half was ice-cream cone-shaped and had wires and cables running from it. This issue of the cone-shaped lower portion led flying saucer sleuths to later suggest the monster my actually have been encased within some kind of remotely piloted vehicle. 

As the creature then turned its attention to the group, and wildly fired laser-like beams from its eyes, the brave band was suddenly brave no more. They didn’t wait to see what might happen next. One and all fled, screaming – possibly for their lives. Mrs. May breathlessly shouted to the boys to follow her to her home, which they all did. On arrival, and possibly as a result of exposure to the noxious odor that hung around the hill, several of the boys became violently ill, feeling nauseous and even outright vomiting. Kathleen May quickly and shakily called the local police, who, rather intriguingly, were busy responding to reports of what was described as an “airplane crash” in the area. It turns out that no such crashed aircraft was ever found – something which suggests the “airplane” and the brightly lit UFO that descended upon the high hill that night were one and the very same. As a result of the fact that Flatwoods was, and still is, a very small town, word soon got out about what had happened. Local media were quickly on the scene, and even the U.S. Air Force sat up and took notice. Despite intense investigations by the press and the military, the mystery of the Flatwoods Monster was never solved – the creature was long gone by the time anyone else was on the scene. It is, however, decidedly interesting to note that Flatwoods is only around 125 miles from the town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia, where, from 1966 to 1967, yet another red-eyed monster was seen. Its famous name is Mothman, and about which, much more later on.

Now, onto the controversial of the late Phliip Corso, who claimed that "aliens" found at Roswell, New Mexico in 1947 were really a form of robots. In July 1997, one of the most controversial UFO-themed books was published. Its title: The Day after Roswell. Its author, Philip J. Corso. Its ghost-writer: Bill Birnes of the television show, UFO Hunters. Simon & Schuster, the publisher of the book provided the following blurb for the book: "A breathtaking exposé that reads like a thriller, The Day After Roswell is a stunning depiction of just what happened in Roswell, New Mexico all those years ago and how the effects of this mysterious unidentified aircraft crash are still relevant today. Former member of President Eisenhower’s National Security Council and the Foreign Technology Desk in the United States Army, Colonel Philip J. Corso was assigned to work at a strange crash site in Roswell in 1947. He had no idea that his work there would change his life and the course of history forever. 

(Nick Redfern) Out at the Roswell crash-site

Not only that, Corso claimed that he saw the bodies of the dwarfish, black-eyed things from the Roswell crash and maintained they were not aliens, per se, but biological robots created by an alien race that we, the Human Race, we have never yet seen. Not only that: but that that same race of robots were time-time travelers. Some of this data, specifically as it related to that robotic side, was similar to that of a man named Nigel Kerner, the author of The Song of the Greys and Grey Aliens and the Harvesting of Souls – the “Greys” being a popular term in UFO research for “aliens.” As for the blurb for Grey Aliens and the Harvesting of Souls, it reads as follows: “In 1997 Nigel Kerner first introduced the notion of aliens known as Greys coming to Earth, explaining that Greys are sophisticated biological robots created by an extraterrestrial civilization they have long since outlived."

Now, onto one of the most famous alien abduction cases. The night of October 10, 1973 was one that Calvin Parker and Charles Hickson would not forget. And it all began in a perfectly normal, relaxed fashion. Forty-two-year-old Hickson and Parker – who was nineteen - worked together and often spent time fishing on Mississippi’s Pascagoula River. It was around 9:00 p.m. on a dark and fateful night when their world came tumbling down around them. For a while the fish were biting. It would, however, not be long before the two men would find themselves reeled in. “Hauled in” might be a better piece of terminology. As they sat on the banks of the river, the two could not fail to see that there was an odd, blue, flickering light in the distance – odd in the sense that it seemed to be following the contours of the river, but slightly above it. Both Hickson and Parker stared at it, trying to figure out what on Earth it was. Earth may very well have had nothing to do with it. They wondered: helicopter? But, there was no noise. An aircraft? Way too low and slow. Someone’s idea of a joke? If only. 

(Nick Redfern) Robots or aliens at the Pascagoula River? Nick Redfern and Calvin Parker

When the strange whatever-it-was got closer, a stark realization quickly hit both men: this was like nothing they had ever seen before. It was a fairly small craft, oval in design, and illuminated – almost glowing. And a vomit-inducing, deep droning sound suddenly enveloped them. Things seemed strange, unreal, dream-like, as the pair tried to scramble away. No such luck: in seconds both Parker and Hickson were rendered almost unable to move. Suddenly, the craft came very close – perilously so – and a doorway opened. The two men stared in confused horror as three entities of a bizarre appearance levitated through the doorway, and, for a few seconds, were suspended in the air – staring directly at the two freaked-out fishermen. Things went from bad to worse: the creatures - which were basically humanoid, had strange faces that resembled tightly-fitting masks and which had three pen-like protrusions stick out of their heads. As for their hands, they were crab-like hands; Hickson would later correct this by referring to them as “lobster”-like. Not only that: the "creatures" appeared somewhat "robot-like." Maybe, that's exactly what they were. In light of all the above, perhaps we should look deeper into the controversy surrounding aliens versus robots. We might find something incredible: that our "aliens" aren't quite what we assume them to be.

Nick Redfern
Nick Redfern works full time as a writer, lecturer, and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. Nick has written 41 books, writes for Mysterious Universe and has appeared on numerous television shows on the The History Channel, National Geographic Channel and SyFy Channel.

Join MU Plus+ and get exclusive shows and extensions & much more! Subscribe Today!

Search: