Oct 10, 2022 I Nick Redfern

Outrageous Hoaxes in Ufology: And Some Still Believe

It's unfortunate that in Ufology there are hoaxes that are still being believed in. And, here's some of them. We'll begin with Contactee, George Adamski. In 1953, Adamski gave a number of lectures in the Los Angeles area, stating that his data on UFOs and aliens had “all been cleared with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Air Force Intelligence.” It most definitely had not been cleared. Personnel from both the FBI and the Air Force heard of this and descended on Adamski, warning him to quit his crap. For a while, Adamski did exactly what he was told to do: Stop! Unfortunately for Adamski, he was a magnet for publicity and praise. So, yet again he told his foaming fans he had supporters in the FBI and the Air Force. That the FBI had agents sitting in every lecture Adamski ever gave in California in the fifties, meant that Hoover’s finest were getting more and more frustrated and angrier by the day. They made a decision: they paid Adamski another visit. Whereas on the first occasion Adamski was “warned” to stop, on the next occasion, as the now-declassified reports show, the FBI “severely admonished” him for all of his extra-terrestrial idiocy.

(Nick Redfern) Out in the wilds of California, where Adamski created his hoaxes

Don't believe me? Check out the FBI's file on Adamski.

The FBI demanded that Adamski would never, ever again make such claims about the military and the FBI. To ensure that, one of the FBI agents whipped out an official document they demanded Adamski sign. He did. One of the agents signed it too, as did a somewhat bemused Air Force officer who thought the whole thing was a farce of epic proportions. Surely that would have made Adamski get the message. It didn’t. The man who claimed to have met 1960s-era hippy-looking aliens was about to find himself in a bucketful of serious shit with a band of unsmiling G-Men. It was roughly nine months further down the line when the FBI’s Los Angeles office received a visit from a representative of the L.A. Better Business Bureau. Staff of the BBB were concerned that Adamski’s 1953 book Flying Saucers Have Landed (co-written with Desmond Leslie) was one big scam.

One way or another, their staff was determined to get the answers. One of the BBB went knocking on Adamski’s door. The whole story of alien encounters was true, Adamski said earnestly to the man. It’s hardly surprising that the BBB was having none of this book of lies and exaggerations. Adamski hit back by saying his book was endorsed by the U.S. government. To prove this, Adamski pulled out of his pocket a document that had a “blue seal in the lower left corner, at the top of which appeared the names of three Government agents,” as the FBI described things. One of those names was attached to an Air Force officer. Two were of FBI agents.

Incredibly, and recklessly, what Adamski had shown to the BBB employee was actually that document Adamski had been ordered to sign some nine months earlier, at the order of the FBI. Worse still for Adamski, he had altered the document. He’d taken real FBI paperwork, fiddled around with it, and changed it for his benefit. This was the last straw for the men in black suits. An FBI summary of this run-around, of December 16, 1953 reads:  “[Deleted] instructed Willis to call on Adamski at the Palomar Gardens Café, Valley Center, California. (This is located five miles east of Rincon, California, near the Mount Palomar Observatory.) Willis was told to have the San Diego agents, accompanied by representatives of OSI if they care to go along, call on Adamski and read the riot act in no uncertain terms pointing out he has used this document in a fraudulent, improper manner, that this Bureau has not endorsed, approved, or cleared his speeches or book, that he knows it, and the Bureau will simply not tolerate any further foolishness, misrepresentations, and falsity on his part. Willis was told to instruct the Agents to diplomatically retrieve, if possible, the document in issue from Adamski. Willis said he would do this and send in a report at once.”

Adamski was very lucky he didn’t end up with some degree of jail-time. Maybe, that would have given him even more publicity, something both the FBI and the Air Force were extremely keen and careful to avoid. That Adamski had the wrath of God put into him finally ensured that his document-doctoring days were over. And, by the late-1950s, Adamski’s “career” as a ufological guru began to tail off. He lived until 1965, by which time many people in Ufology had dismissed the man and his wacky, “I flew to Venus”-style pseudo-science.

Now, let's have a look at a Rendlesham Forest hoax, in the form of a "government document." It was in the mid 1980s when the hoax took place. And, for a while some believed it. In fact, I know of one person in Ufology who is still a believer. Too bad. It looks like a U.K. Ministry of Defense document. But, it's not. It's just a joke. The document reads as follows: QUOTE: "Dear [Deleted], As you know, OSI has completed a report on the landing of a craft of unknown origin crewed by several entities near RAF Bentwaters on the night of December 29/30 1980. Interestingly, OSI reports that the entities were approximately 1 1/2 metres tall, wore what appeared to be nylon-coated pressure suits, but no helmets. Conditions on the night were misty, giving the appearance that the entities were hovering above ground level.

"Tape recordings were made on which the entities are heard to speak in an electronically synthesized version of English, with a strong American accent. Similar transmissions intercepted (possible word omitted) irregularly by NSA since 1975. According to OSI, entities had claw-like hands with three digits and an opposable thumb. Despite original reports, OSI said the craft was not damaged but landed deliberately as part of a series of visits to SAC bases in USA and Europe. Reports that craft was repaired by US servicemen or was taken on to the base are not confirmed by OSI. Landing is not considered a Defence issue in view of the overt peaceful nature of the contact, but investigations by DS8 are to be continued on [Deleted] authority. Precautionary plan for counter-information at a local level involving [Deleted] and a [Deleted] is strongly recommended." And that's the end of that piece of Rendlesham garbage.

Now and again, I get asked for my views on an extremely controversial UFO case that first surfaced back in 1980. It all revolved around the supposed shooting of an extraterrestrial creature on a military base in New Jersey. The statement was made to the late UFO researcher, Leonard Stringfield, who was a long-time collector of stories of crashed UFOs and dead aliens. It's a story told by the key source, a man that Stringfield gave the pseudonym of "Jeffrey Morse." On September 23, 1980 Stringfield received a communication in the mail from "Morse," who claimed a military background and who had a startling tale to tell. It began as follows:

(Nick Redfern) No dead aliens at McGuire Air Force Base

"In January of 1978, I was stationed at McGuire AFB, N.J. One evening, during the time frame of 0300 hrs. and 0500 hrs., there were a number of UFO sightings in the area over the air field and Ft. Dix MP’s were running code in the direction of Brownsville, N.J. A state trooper then entered Gate #5 at the rear of the base requesting assistance and permission to enter. I was dispatched and the trooper wanted access to the runway area which led to the very back of the air field and connected with a heavily wooded area which is part of the Dix training area. He informed me that a Ft. Dix MP was pursuing a low flying object which then hovered over his car. He described it as oval shaped, with no details, and glowing with a bluish-green color. His radio transmission was cut off. At that time in front of his police car, appeared a thing, about 4 feet tall, grayish, brown, fat head, long arms, and slender body. The MP panicked and fired five rounds from his .45 cal. into the thing, and one round into the object above. The object then fled straight up and joined with eleven others high in the sky. This we all saw but didn’t know the details at the time. Anyway, the thing ran into the woods towards our fenceline and they went to look for it. By this time several patrols were involved."

The "document" continues: "Now and again, I get asked for my views on an extremely controversial UFO case that first surfaced back in 1980. It all revolved around the supposed shooting of an extraterrestrial creature on a military base in New Jersey. The statement was made to the late UFO researcher, Leonard Stringfield, who was a long-time collector of stories of crashed UFOs and dead aliens. It's a story told by the key source, a man that Stringfield gave the pseudonym of "Jeffrey Morse." On September 23, 1980 Stringfield received a communication in the mail from "Morse," who claimed a military background and who had a startling tale to tell. It began as follows:

"In January of 1978, I was stationed at McGuire AFB, N.J. One evening, during the time frame of 0300 hrs. and 0500 hrs., there were a number of UFO sightings in the area over the air field and Ft. Dix MP’s were running code in the direction of Brownsville, N.J. A state trooper then entered Gate #5 at the rear of the base requesting assistance and permission to enter. I was dispatched and the trooper wanted access to the runway area which led to the very back of the air field and connected with a heavily wooded area which is part of the Dix training area. He informed me that a Ft. Dix MP was pursuing a low flying object which then hovered over his car. He described it as oval shaped, with no details, and glowing with a bluish-green color. His radio transmission was cut off. At that time in front of his police car, appeared a thing, about 4 feet tall, grayish, brown, fat head, long arms, and slender body. The MP panicked and fired five rounds from his .45 cal. into the thing, and one round into the object above. The object then fled straight up and joined with eleven others high in the sky. This we all saw but didn’t know the details at the time. Anyway, the thing ran into the woods towards our fenceline and they went to look for it. By this time several patrols were involved."

The document continues: "We found the body of the thing near the runway. It had apparently climbed the fence and died while running. It was all of a sudden hush-hush and no one was allowed near the area. We roped off the area and AFOSI came out and took over. That was the last I saw of it. There was a bad stench coming from it too. Like ammonia smelling but wasn’t constant [in] the air. That day, a team from Wright-Patterson AFB came in a C141 and went to the area. They crated it in a wooden box, sprayed something over it, and then put it into a bigger metal container. They loaded it in the plane and took off. That was it, nothing more said, no report made and we were all told not to have anything to say about it or we would be court-martialed. I will be getting out of the Air Force in about two months. Do not disclose my name as I could get into trouble. I am interested in pursuing this and other matters if you need help. Forgive me for not signing this but I can’t take any chances. Please reply to the above address and my parents will forward it to me or I will be home already. Don’t send it here because they monitor all mail closely and I again don’t want to take any chances." Yep, another hoax.

Nick Redfern

Nick Redfern works full time as a writer, lecturer, and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. Nick has written 41 books, writes for Mysterious Universe and has appeared on numerous television shows on the The History Channel, National Geographic Channel and SyFy Channel.

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