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Sightings of UFOs in the skies of our planet have been reported for decades – and perhaps, even, for hundreds, and maybe thousands, of years. But what about the sound of a UFO? Interestingly, there are numerous accounts on-record where UFOs have reportedly emitted deep, resonating, humming noises that seem to exert some form of both physical and mental influence over the witnesses. Not only that, such encounters have also left eyewitnesses feeling distinctly ill and disorientated.

It was the night of 20 August 1957 when a guard was standing watch near a U.S. Air Force aircraft that had crashed near Quilino, Argentina. Suddenly, he heard an “eerie hum” and was amazed to see above him a large, seemingly metallic, disc-shaped UFO. In stark terror, he attempted to draw his pistol, but with the humming sound becoming deeper and deeper, he found himself unable to do so and was certain that his very self-will was under extreme threat. Most fascinating of all, the guard then had an overwhelming sensation that his mind was being “flooded” with information from an intelligence aboard the UFO that revolved around mankind’s misuse of atomic energy – something that he perceived was of great concern to those inside the craft.

Likewise, in December 1967, Mrs. Rita Maley was driving along Route 34 to Ithaca, New York, when she became aware of an unidentified red light that seemed to be following her. Glancing out of the window, she was shocked to see an illuminated object that was maneuvering near a row of power lines: “It made a humming sound, something like the vibration of a television antenna in the wind,” she later stated.

As with the Argentinean Air Force guard, Mrs. Maley reported that she felt the humming sound was taking away her self-will – and she also found that her car would not respond properly. Interestingly, she added that her son – who was in the car with her – “was in some kind of trance” during the time that the UFO was in view. Similarly, newspaper clippings in my possession from the same time-period show that the Putney area of England had, for a considerable period of time, been plagued by a very similar deep hum that manifested in the early hours of the morning.

But most notable of all, is something that has become known as the Taos Hum. Throughout the late 1980s and 1990s, literally hundreds of residents of Taos, New Mexico, reported that their lives had been adversely affected by a strange humming sound that proliferated throughout the entire area. And it may not be without relevance that in the same time frame, a number of profound UFO encounters occurred in the vicinity, too. Speculation that the sounds were possibly the result of secret Department of Defense experiments, led U.S. Representative, Bill Richardson, to initiate inquiries. Unfortunately, they failed to uncover anything of tangible significance.

Still with the 1990s: in March 1993, a stunning sighting of a vast UFO occurred in the skies over England’s sprawling Cannock Chase woods, and specifically over the town of Rugeley. The event in question was investigated by none other than Nick Pope of the British Ministry of Defense, who, at the time, was working the “UFO Desk.” When, in 1997, I spoke with Pope about this affair,  he told me: “There was something else that I’d come across in my investigations that was also present in the Rugeley case. This was a low-frequency humming sound coming from the UFO; it was a humming that they actually described as being quite unpleasant. Imagine standing in front of the speakers at a pop concert and almost feeling the sound as well as hearing it – that was the effect that they reported.”

There is one other potentially very disturbing issue that may very well be related to this particular controversy, too. Via the terms of the Freedom of Information Act, the Defense Intelligence Agency has released a remarkable series of files pertaining to classified experiments to determine the effects of sound waves on the human body. Most pertinent of all, one section of the files deals with certain effects of ultra-sound on human beings – effects that can lead to drowsiness and an abnormal need for sleep:

“Another effect of ultrasound was disturbances in sleeping patterns. The need for sleep was felt by one group during actual work. Some individuals were overcome by drowsiness and in longer pauses fell asleep standing up or in other normally uncomfortable positions.” More alarming, the files state that the U.S. Department of Defense was studying (as far back as 1972) research by the Soviets, who were trying to determine if both high- and low-frequency sound-waves could be utilized to induce heart-attacks in otherwise healthy people.

Moreover, in July 1998, it was announced by the U.S. Army’s Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (AARD), that they had developed an “acoustic weapon” that could be directed against hostile crowds. Astonishingly, the weapon, it was revealed, had been tested successfully on targets at a distance of no less than one hundred and ten yards.

As the AARD explained, the weapon was “machine-gun sized,” was designed to be operated by three personnel, was powered by a giant battery and was intended to be mounted atop a jeep or tank. “More powerful versions used in tests against animals have even made organs within the body reverberate, causing serious physical damage or death,” it was explained. “The Pentagon has demanded a working prototype by next year.”

Maybe someone else – someone from far, far away – perfected near-identical technology eons ago, and has been secretly using it on us, the Human Race, for years, as evidenced by those cases cited above…

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Nick Redfern works full time as a writer, lecturer, and journalist. He writes about a wide range of unsolved mysteries, including Bigfoot, UFOs, the Loch Ness Monster, alien encounters, and government conspiracies. Nick has written 41 books, writes for Mysterious Universe and has appeared on numerous television shows on the The History Channel, National Geographic Channel and SyFy Channel.
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