MUPLUS+   Join Plus+ and get exclusive shows and extensions! Subscribe Today! LEARN MORE  

 
Close

Advertise here now!

 
 
the-space-clock

Mysteries of Time and Space – Reviewed

It was back in 1977 – when I was just twelve years old – that I purchased a copy of Brad Steiger’s classic book, Mysteries of Time and Space. I was exposed to the worlds of the paranormal and the supernatural around five or six years earlier, when my parents took me to Loch Ness, Scotland; home of the legendary, long-necked Nessie (or Nessies, depending on your perspective). In an instant, my life was changed. Brad’s book was among the first titles on the domain of the unknown on which I spent my pocket-money, as well as my earnings from delivering newspapers around town. I still have that now-well-worn book. The copy that came into my eager hands was published in the UK – where I’m originally from – by Sphere Books, Ltd. Its bright purple cover, which was dominated by a painting of a classic flying saucer, jumped out at me. It still does, years later.

I recall eagerly digesting the pages of Mysteries of Time and Space, and marveling at the enigmas – ancient and modern – that filled the pages of the book. It may sound like a classic cliché, but I really did stay up late in my bedroom reading its packed pages. I wish I could say those nights were dark and stormy, but I can’t be sure. I hope they were. What I can be sure of, however, is that Brad’s book opened my mind to a wide-range of enigmas – and ultimately played a significant role in spurring me on to do my own investigations and, eventually, writings, too.

Brad Steiger's book

That I have come to know Brad, have co-written a book with him (The Zombie Book), and have become friends with him, are all major bonuses. None of which would have come about had I not stumbled on Mysteries of Time and Space in my pre-teen years. In that sense, this is not just a book filled with fascinating tales of the unknown; it’s also a book with a great deal of meaning for me. With that all said, you may be wondering why I’m making mention of the book right now. The answer is very simple: Anomalist Books have published a brand new edition of Brad’s book.

As well as publishing completely new books on the worlds of all-things ufological, cryptozoological, ghostly, conspiratorial, and supernatural, Anomalist Books have a great track-record of making available some of the older, classic books on paranormal phenomena. I’m talking about the likes of Peter Costello’s In Search of Lake Monsters; John Keel’s Jadoo and Operation Trojan Horse; and Jacques Vallee’s Confrontations; Dimensions; and Revelations. So, what do you get for your money with Mysteries of Time and Space? Well, I’ll tell you.

Ancient mysteries – and accounts of lands, civilizations, and fantastic technologies that reportedly surfaced long before our present-day civilization began to develop – are a big part of the story. We’re talking about the likes of the legendary land of Atlantis and the “United States of Iynkicidu.” The menacing Men in Black make significant appearances, too. Indeed, Brad’s book was one of the very first I read that focused significant pages to the MIB puzzle. Brad shares with us his thoughts and ideas on the MIB, and the way in which the mystery began. UFO encounters, entities from other realms of existence, animals and pets of the unique and curious kinds, the “Trickster” phenomenon, and time-based anomalies comprise the pages of this classic book. And, of course, there’s much more, too.

I should stress that the re-release of Mysteries of Time and Space is not an exercise in nostalgia. In fact, quite the opposite: what we have here is a book that is still relevant today and from which much can be learned, decades after it originally first surfaced. Whether you are twelve (as I was), twenty, thirty, or seventy, if you have not read the book you really should. Not just for the material contained within its pages, but also because Brad knows how to write: he understands that style and keeping the reader entranced are as important as the content.

I will leave the final words to Brad himself, who says in the new Introduction to his book: “Of all the books I have written – 181 thus far – number 66, Mysteries of Time and Space, shall forever remain one of my very favorite books. Not only did it allow me to present exciting new concepts and theories to a much wider audience, but with its great popularity in the 1970s, it allowed me to ignite the imaginations and to stretch the reality of new readers throughout the world.”

 TAGS: , ,