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Nessie is Back! New Sighting is First in Nine Months

The cryptozoology world has been scrambling for explanations after Nessie seemingly vanished over the last year. Nessie’s official record keeper, Gary Campbell, announced the elusive creature was officially missing after the ‘monster’ of Loch Ness wasn’t seen in nearly nine months. Now, the strange saga of Nessie’s disappearance might have come to an end, according to Campbell. On May 1st, 2017, Campbell recorded the first sighting of Nessie since August 2016.

The first photograph of Nessie taken in 2017.

2017’s first photograph of…something. Nessie, or maybe just a stick?

“Nessie” was seen by Manchester resident Hayley Johnson, who spotted an odd form rising from the water of Urquhart Bay near Inverness, Scotland. Johnson managed to snap a photograph of the blurry, distant form before it receded into the cold, dark waters of Loch Ness.

Hayley Johnson, who spotted Nessie on May Day 2017.

Hayley Johnson, who spotted Nessie on May Day 2017.

Johnson told The Sun that while she’s not exactly a Nessie believer, this sighting has her convinced:

I am a really skeptical person. I have never even been to Loch Ness before, but I decided to come up for the Bank Holiday. I had stayed in a backpackers’ hotel and on my last night decided to go for a walk through the woods and ended up on the banks of the loch. It was lovely and at dusk. Then about half a mile away I saw this dark shape sticking up – like a neck. I thought at first it was a tree, but it was very strange. I took a picture. It was there for a couple of seconds, but when I looked back it was gone. I was shocked.

Gary Campbell, meanwhile, says that this latest sighting might not exactly be an intact dead specimen washed up on shore, but it’s at least a reassuring sign that Nessie (or at least a sighting of ‘Nessie’) has returned:

This a credible sighting but is obviously unexplained. I was quite worried that there had been an eight month gap since the last sighting and so was the whole world it seemed. I fielded calls from around the world – from Moscow, Adelaide and California, everywhere, asking what had happened to Nessie? I am relieved and delighted with this sighting – and so will the planet!

We sure are relieved. It would be a shame if Nessie were to disappear before we once and for all identify whatever she (He? Ze? It?) is – if there is anything at all to identify, that is. Of course, not knowing is half of the appeal of Nessie. In a world where fewer and fewer mysteries remain, the elusive Loch Ness monster reminds us of the limits of our science and the limitlessness of our imagination.