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Lithuanian Woman Claims Sand-Only Diet Saved Her Life

You’re probably familiar with the Mono Diet or some form of it. The “mono” refers to the fact that, at least for a time, the dietary practitioner eats one and only one food, often as many as desired, although it should come as no surprise that the desire drops quickly after the food becomes boring. And it will become boring, because it’s never chocolate or donuts. Famous mono dieters include the tall talking half of Penn & Teller, illusionist Penn Jillette, who claims he lost 100 pounds eating nothing but potatoes credited his 100-pound weight loss to eating nothing but potatoes; actor Matt Damon, who ate not potatoes (despite their major role in The Martian) but boneless chicken breasts to lose weight for a role; and the controversial YouTuber Freelee the Banana Girl who claimed … oh, you can figure this one out for yourself.

Now comes Stanislava the Sand Lady. Seventy-year-old Stanislava Monstvilene of Lithuania told Ruptly that she switched to a mono diet long before they became popular. However, her sole food of choice will most likely not become as popular as bananas, because Stanislava says she subsists solely on sand. Before you gag and reach for a glass of water, Stanislava claims she desperately switched to sand for medical reasons and it may have saved her life.

“I had a late stage brain tumor. They said I wouldn’t last long. My hemoglobin level was 60 [some five times over the normal range]. I was passing by and once an idea came to my mind – take the sand and eat it. For the first time I choked but then I got used to it.”

Does it help to make it look like food?

Ten years later, Stanislava is still alive and kicking sand into her bucket and onto her plate (see for yourself in this video). And, while she doesn’t have her own YouTube channel (yet), she seems to be using the interview as a way to promote a mono sand diet.

“You should not mix it with food or water. You should not eat anything else, otherwise you will feel sick. And the water should not be drunk. I used to eat wet sand so after it I do not want to drink.”

Kids, don’t try this at home, although therapist Liliana Vaishvilene told Ruptly that, although she hasn’t verified that Stanislava doesn’t eat anything else, she looks pretty good.

“She has good blood. We examined her a while ago, but for the past few years she has not visited and has not applied for medical help.”

Yes, all parties involved know about geophagy, the habit of eating sand, clay, mud or dirt which falls under the broader category of Pica, which is the abnormal urge to eat non-food items in general (soap, paint, coins, etc.) Stories of it date back to the ancient Greeks and are generally attributed to pregnant women. Unless sand is capable of more miracles than removing brain tumors, 70-year-old Stanislava isn’t pregnant. However, the number of reported incidents of geophagy have risen, possibly due to the increased reporting of eating disorders, and some nutritionists admit that clay can absorb toxins when mixed with other foods, allowing them to be eaten without becoming sick – acorns are an example.

Adding sand doesn’t help all foods.

But sand? We’re glad you’re cured of your brain tumor, Stanislava, but we’ll need more than a video and an interview with Ruptly. Have you considered teaming up with Freelee the Banana Girl?

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Paul Seaburn Paul Seaburn is one of the most prolific writers at Mysterious Universe. He’s written for TV shows such as "The Tonight Show", "Politically Incorrect" and an award-winning children’s program. He's been published in “The New York Times" and "Huffington Post” and has co-authored numerous collections of trivia, puzzles and humor. Paul likes to add a bit of humor to each MU post he crafts. After all, the mysterious doesn't always have to be serious.
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