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episode-905-mysterious-universe

Episode 905 – Mysterious Universe

Dr. Rita Louise helps us break-in the new studio this week with an in depth look at her new book “Man Made: The Chronicles of our Extraterrestrial Gods“. Louise takes us into remote antiquity to discover the truth behind ancient mythology and the striking parallel symbolism seen throughout humanity’s past.

We also feature the sad news of the passing of remote viewing legend Ingo Swann and take one last look at some of his most stimulating work.

Read on for show notes, music, and book links.

This episode is proudly sponsored by Audible (Not Rabbits). Click here to get your FREE audiobook!

Aaron’s Audible Recommendation – At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

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Dr Rita Louise

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  • http://twitter.com/thetechdiva Erica TechDiva

    Pronunciation of the deities aside, I was intrigued and bought the book so that I can judge for myself.

  • photonjr

    Have to agree with electron_sponge too. Two more points:
    1. Dr.
    Louise: “How can you be god and die?” Statement made me really
    angry–demonstrates an obvious modern, western-centric understanding of
    god that’s extremely biased. There are gods throughout mythology that
    die or suffer like mortal beings:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dying-and-rising_god. I suppose you could
    argue that many of these gods don’t truly “die” in that they rise again,
    but, well, many of them do: “The very existence of the category
    “dying-and-rising-god” was debated
    throughout the 20th century, and the soundness of the category was
    widely questioned, given that many of the proposed gods did not return
    in a permanent sense as the same deity.”

    2.
    Yeah, the fact that multiple flood myths exist across one culture
    doesn’t prove the existence of a flood myth. There are plenty of
    recurring themes throughout world mythology: cannibalism’s a good
    example. There are plenty of mythological gods + monsters who eat
    people, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they were real–instead it
    teaches us about our shared understanding of the world/consciousness,
    i.e. when we’re young children we see our parents as huge, mouthy
    monsters, so it makes sense that our ancestors would want to depict
    their creator-ish gods in such a fashion. Also, civilization has some
    very basic rules, one of them being “don’t eat your friends,” so the
    most uncivilized, horrifying of the monsters created by our ancestors
    are those that eat others.

    All the evidence I’ve seen points to
    the same stuff regarding the flood myth: while it’s fascinating that
    cultures share a flood myth, it likely has more to do with the fact that
    cultures *need* a creation myth, and understand rain and water to be a
    primal destructive/renewing force. There’s no legitimate archaeological
    evidence to support the idea that a “great flood” happened. It seems
    ignorant to examine the commonalities between these myths without taking
    any psychology or anthropology into account.

    Comparative
    mythology is really, really fun and interesting, BUT it shouldn’t be
    taken as proof of anything. These myths do not disintegrate at all just
    because they share themes–the fact that they share themes reveals a
    lot about how we as *humans* think, not about history. Seems to me that
    if you adopt Dr. Louise’s narrow-minded point of view, you risk
    ignoring evidence of things there are proof for–evolution, for
    example–just because there are many, many myths throughout the world
    that state a god or gods created all life on earth.

    Aaaaand I should probably get back to my real job. Keep up the good work, MU!

  • Lyon25

    This was one of the best episodes ever. Great interview w/ Dr. Rita Louise and the remote viewing story was awesome as well. So glad I have Plus, but if I didn’t, that teaser would’ve made me go get it right away.
    Love the new website format as well. Just re-upped for 1 yr.

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    >Thor’s Hammer returned to its owner. A boomerang returns to its owner.
    How that compares with the scythe that castrated the sky god Uranus
    demands some imagination. The comparative shapes of a boomerang and a
    scythe perhaps? They’re both a bit banana-shaped. Perhaps the banana is
    the key! How did I not see this before?

    Not a Krull fan, I see ;)

    http://youtu.be/ZDJaBHxt-E0

  • http://www.facebook.com/diana.bunnellremillard Diana Bunnell-Remillard

    This was a really interesting interview, but I have to admit that after a while it seemed as if Dr Louise was starting to become repetitive and dismissive of ideas not her own. Especially with the whole Flood story – in this age of global warming we are constantly being reminded that there are many areas of the globe that will soon be under the seas. Couldn’t be possible that the melting of glaciers could have created similar catastrophic events over decades that became legend and then myths? They certainly would have been global and accounted for the wide array of flood stories- and Dr Robert Ballard has been invetigating these ideas for some time: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/explorer-bob-ballard-finds-proof-ancient-flood-article-1.1220407

    Also I hesitate to say this, I am not convinced that Dr Loiuse reads Ancient Greek and Sumerian or Russian and Japanese – when reading a lot of these texts they are often translated and are being read out of context in a western mindset. Even the Bible we know has been translated 2-3 times. A lot gets lost, and that leads to misinterpretation….:-(

    Anywhoo thanks for bringing such thought provoking conversations!
    PS- F* the Box

  • patrickm01

    I also was really irritated by this interview. Others have said it better than I probably can, but I’ll give two examples: As #electron_sponge said, the whole scythe/boomerang thing was just so patently wrong-headed that it pretty much ruined her for me. I’m sorry, but scythes and boomerangs are not alike just because she says so. (And unlike Thor’s hammer, boomerangs do not return if they actually hit something.) And then, when she said repeatedly that “scientists claim there’s no life on Mars, I just about spit out my coffee. NO scientist of whom I’m aware claims there’s no life on Mars. If there are any, they are a tiny minority. We’re spending huge sums of money on Mars missions, why? To find the life scientists and everyone else strongly suspects is there, for goodness sake!

    Studying myths is great. Making sh** up to try to support a non-evidence-based theory that Zeus and Thor were real physical historical beings is not great. Please do not invite this woman back. I’ll be unable to listen to that episode.